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Mar
23
accepted How to solve $ f'(x) = k x \cdot f(x) $
Mar
18
comment How to solve $ f'(x) = k x \cdot f(x) $
@Amzoti, if you post that comment as an answer I'll accept it
Mar
18
asked How to solve $ f'(x) = k x \cdot f(x) $
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
2
awarded  Promoter
Apr
2
awarded  Tumbleweed
Mar
26
asked AUTO Software for ODE's: references or forums?
Dec
23
comment Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
the function x(t0,x0) is a function of two variables, but it is expanded in only one of them.
Dec
18
comment Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
Great answer. I knew of the geometrical interpretation, just needed assurance on the Taylor expansion.
Dec
18
accepted Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
Dec
17
comment Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
@yoknapatawpha, edited, thanks!
Dec
17
revised Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
Typo
Dec
17
asked Derive forward Euler method for two-variable function
Dec
15
accepted Prove that there are no fixed points in a non-autonomous system
Oct
28
comment Prove that there are no fixed points in a non-autonomous system
Maybe it's my understanding of fixed points that is somewhat lacking. Is it a necessary condition for a fixed point to occur that $\dot x_1 = 0, \dot x_2 = 0, ... \dot x_{n+1} = 0$?
Oct
28
asked Prove that there are no fixed points in a non-autonomous system
Oct
18
comment Forced nonlinear oscillator - analytical methods
It was a great help, thanks. I've just verified the validity numerically - the solution trajectories of Duffing's equation converges to one attractor when there is one solution, and one of two attractors depending on initial conditions when there are three solutions (one is unstable). So it works!
Oct
18
accepted Forced nonlinear oscillator - analytical methods
Oct
18
comment Forced nonlinear oscillator - analytical methods
Now THIS is math: "We will ignore these terms because...(e.g., γ is small, etc. etc.)." Physicist? ;-)