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I am a graduate student at UCLA.


3h
comment The Cantor set and integrability of $\frac{1}{x}$
Yep, that's right!
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
The trick is illustrated under "Sum" on Wikipedia here: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arithmetic_progression
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
I've fixed your post. Gauss's trick was a clever way to sum up the first $100$ natural numbers, but the same trick works for any arithmetic series.
8h
revised What is the name of this summation formula?
added 1 character in body
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
@BenT Gauss's Trick works for any arithmetic series, meaning that if you take an arithmetic series and add it term-wise to its reverse, then you will get a constant series.
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
By reintroducing the pair of dollar signs, which Jack M was so kind as to add to your post, and which you removed in your last edit! ;-)
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
I see you prefer your TeX in the nude?
8h
comment What is the name of this summation formula?
The first formula would be the triangle numbers. Not sure how a floor managed to sneak into your second formula, though? Unless those square brackets are just for grouping.
10h
answered The Cantor set and integrability of $\frac{1}{x}$
10h
comment The Cantor set and integrability of $\frac{1}{x}$
sure, I'll do that.
1d
comment $|G'/G''| \geq p^3$ where $G$ is $p$ group
Am I missing something regarding 1? Isn't $G$ abelian iff $G'$ has order 1?
Apr
14
comment grouping non-zero entries in a matrix according to a rule
As someone said already, you should probably ask this on a cs forum instead.
Apr
14
comment grouping non-zero entries in a matrix according to a rule
That's right; you need to check whether there are any other entries that are in the same row and column as any of the ones you've seen so far. You're not done with a given group until after you've done this for every entry encountered.
Apr
14
comment grouping non-zero entries in a matrix according to a rule
You mean for programming? If you're doing it by hand, I don't think you're going to do much better than this; your brain is built to pick out patterns like two entries being in the same row and column. If you're programming it, that's a computer science question, and I strongly suspect depends heavily on the type of data structure being used.
Apr
14
answered grouping non-zero entries in a matrix according to a rule
Apr
13
answered Can we find some constraint about order of $xy$ in a group $G$?
Apr
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Dot Product Intuition
Apr
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Convert sum to function
Apr
12
comment Properties Shared by Equivalent Categories
I'm not sure what $\tilde F$ is in your work above, but here's what I came up with: Let $\lambda: F(U \times V) \to F(W)^{F(V)} \times F(V)$ be the unique morphism given by the universal property of the exponential. Then applying $G$ to the diagram, you get a resulting diagram which contains several instances of $GF$, which lend themselves to the use of $GF \simeq id_C$; in particular, you get selected isomorphisms $G(F(U \times V)) \simeq U \times V$ and $G(F(W)) \simeq W$, which are the objects you want in your final diagram. These selected isomorphisms allow you to substitute them in.
Apr
12
comment Properties Shared by Equivalent Categories
Just fyi, editing your question is a more effective way to bump the thread and get people reading it, so that you're not left waiting on the random person who decided on a whim to make a comment.