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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
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Aug
7
comment Deformable circle from a cubic Bezier approximation
Oh well, sorry then, it's a bit too complicated for me.
Aug
6
comment Deformable circle from a cubic Bezier approximation
Hehe, I answered the question but NURBS curves don't have this problem as they are only made of one segment that can be circular.
Aug
6
comment Deformable circle from a cubic Bezier approximation
Not question related but: fun fact: NURBS can reproduce a real circle, not just an approximation.
Sep
22
comment Is MDCDXXXIV a correct roman numeral?
Ok, that's what I thought. Thanks for the confirmation: the 1m high carved in stone date on that tall building is totally messed up. You should always proof read your architectural work.
Sep
6
comment What should be the proportions of a three sided coin?
I don't think so, I think it depends of the angle covered by the surface from the center of gravity. That's all I could figure out. Imagine a real coin with the dimensions you said. It won't have the properties I want.
Sep
6
comment What should be the proportions of a three sided coin?
I'm pretty sure it's not only a question of surface but that it depends of the distance of that surface with the center of gravity. A surface close to the center is more stable than the same surface a bit further.
Sep
6
comment What should be the proportions of a three sided coin?
@DBF No, it would work if it was a sphere, but the distance between each point of the coin and the center of the object is not constant, this approach is useless, I tried.
Apr
2
comment Best Fake Proofs? (A M.SE April Fools Day collection)
Someone with an art degree would say: all odd numbers are prime? Let's check: 1 is prime, 2 is prime, 3 is prime, 4 is prime, 5 is prime, ...
Jul
19
comment Are there an infinite set of sets that only have one element in common with each other?
Also: there are some cards that have the same symbol in common. For example: there are 3+ cards with a heart, as shown here: party-games.fr/client/gfx/photos/produit/DOBBLE_PS_778.jpg, which would imply to your calculation that there are points that are on 3+ lines.
Jul
19
comment Are there an infinite set of sets that only have one element in common with each other?
Hehe, I didn't lose any cards, it's the number of cards included in the game, according to the box. That same box also tells me there are 50 symbols altogether, if it helps.
Jul
19
comment Are there an infinite set of sets that only have one element in common with each other?
Very interresting, @AndreaMori. If you have a complete explanation, I would love to hear it.
Jul
19
comment Are there an infinite set of sets that only have one element in common with each other?
Yes, the number of elements altograther is missing. I don't know it. I added an edit: each element appear in the same number of sets.
Jul
19
comment Are there an infinite set of sets that only have one element in common with each other?
Duh, of course. Sorry, my bad. I edited the question. Your answer is perfectly correct but my question was missing something.
Jun
7
comment How to prove such a function doesn't exist?
Yeah, well… ahem… thanks.
Dec
11
comment Why $2\sqrt{x} + \sqrt{3}$ can’t be simplified any further?
Oops, no, didn't see it.
Dec
9
comment Trick to find multiples mentally
@ArturoMagidin Yes, I meant multiples. It's corrected.
Dec
1
comment What would this curve be called?
No problem, my pleasure!
Nov
28
comment How can I prove this theorem about polynomials?
It looks like homework. Please add the "homework" tag if it is so.
Nov
1
comment Path from $(1,1)$ to $(4,4)$ with least number of lattice points within a certain distance
Maybe you should think of a better name for your question. This one is too vague.
Nov
1
comment Path from $(1,1)$ to $(4,4)$ with least number of lattice points within a certain distance
+1 for iterative thinking, I think it may be the only way to prove that: first from $(1;1)$ to $(2;2)$, then to $(3;3)$ and then to $(n;m)$