1,667 reputation
1730
bio website none
location United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Sep 23 at 11:52

Currently studying for an Msc in Mathematics


Sep
19
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
11
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
3
accepted Axiom of Limitation of Size Reference Request
Aug
19
comment If G is a group of order n=35, then it is cyclic
@JoeDub I'm slightly confused. I have assumed that $|G|=pq$ and so all elements must be of finite order?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jun
22
comment Axiom of Limitation of Size Reference Request
Thanks, I managed to track down a reference to von Neumann's collected works, I imagine it would be far to convenient if there happened to be a translation somewhere
Jun
22
asked Axiom of Limitation of Size Reference Request
Jun
17
asked What Is The Product Functor
May
23
comment Showing that $\mathbb{R}\times [0,1]$ is quasi-isometric to $\mathbb{R}$
@DanielFischer Just the standard metric (euclidean) I think as it is not specified.
May
23
comment Showing that $\mathbb{R}\times [0,1]$ is quasi-isometric to $\mathbb{R}$
@drhab I have edited in the definition of quasi-isometric, does this help?
May
23
revised Showing that $\mathbb{R}\times [0,1]$ is quasi-isometric to $\mathbb{R}$
added 398 characters in body
May
23
asked Showing that $\mathbb{R}\times [0,1]$ is quasi-isometric to $\mathbb{R}$
May
22
comment Do we sometimes have to go “each way” separately for iff proofs?
I find this question interesting, although it may have a simple answer, I could imagine there being some crazy counterexample- I'm thinking of some sort of independence proof?
May
22
comment Showing that triangles in $\mathbb{Z}$ are thin
@DerekHolt Ah yes of course, thanks for the help! :) If you wish to post as an answer I would gladly accept
May
22
comment Showing that triangles in $\mathbb{Z}$ are thin
@DerekHolt thanks. Could you explain your first line a bit please?
May
22
asked Showing that triangles in $\mathbb{Z}$ are thin
May
20
awarded  Electorate
May
19
comment Showing geodesics in $\mathbb{H}^2$ have unique common perpendicular or common endpoint
OK, but how do I go about doing this?
May
19
comment Showing geodesics in $\mathbb{H}^2$ have unique common perpendicular or common endpoint
Is there no way I can do this with intermediate value theorem like you suggested? Something like taking a $\gamma_3$ that intersects $\gamma_2$ perpendicularly and then vary the endpoints of $\gamma_3$ somehow to get the intersection with $\gamma_1$ to be perpendicular?