1,902 reputation
516
bio website dualaud.net
location Rolla, MO
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 13 hours ago

Graduate student at Missouri University of Science & Technology.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
10
answered Prove that $\displaystyle \lim_{x \to 0} \frac{\sin(\sin(x))}{x} = 1$
Apr
18
answered What is a good topic for an essay on applications of Calculus 3?
Jan
31
revised Why do we need to learn integration techniques?
removed something that is technically incorrect and an abuse of notation
Dec
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
20
comment Why are quadratic forms so special and why not investigate in higher forms?
I'm not really sure but it may have something to do with $L^2$ being the only Hilbert space among the $L^p$ spaces.
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Aug
18
accepted Discrete Bessel Functions
Aug
18
awarded  Benefactor
Aug
16
awarded  Promoter
Aug
13
asked Discrete Bessel Functions
Apr
17
comment What does $||x||$ mean?
Yes, it is equivalent to the magnitude.
Apr
16
awarded  Civic Duty
Feb
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
comment Union of a countable collection of open balls
It's not really possible in general to describe a closed set as the union of open sets of a given topological space unless you use to the subspace topology on your set, but that could be argued as cheating :).
Feb
10
revised Union of a countable collection of open balls
added 60 characters in body (fixed answer to work in R^n)
Feb
10
comment Union of a countable collection of open balls
So given a small $\epsilon$ and any real number $x$, you can pick a rational number $y$ that is less than $\epsilon$ away from $x$. Say you picked $x=3.14159...$ and $\epsilon = 0.001$. Then you can pick the rational number $y = 3.14159$, then $y$ would be a rational number "$\epsilon$-close" to $\pi$, since $|y-\pi|<0.001$.
Feb
10
revised Union of a countable collection of open balls
added 60 characters in body (fixed answer to work in R^n)
Feb
10
comment Union of a countable collection of open balls
I made some typos, let me correct them! By $A$ is a dense subset of $B$ I mean if you pick any element $x \in B$ and choose any $\epsilon > 0$, then there is some $y \in A$ such that $x$ is in the ball of radius epsilon of $x$.
Feb
10
answered Union of a countable collection of open balls