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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Sep 17 at 7:45

University of Coruña, Spain


Oct
10
awarded  Yearling
Oct
10
comment Relation between a random variable and its conditional expectation
For each event $G$, $X|G$ is a different random variable. If by "when $X=0$" you mean that you are considering the random variable $X|[X=0],$ that is a "constant random variable" (i. e. it takes only one value) and indeed, its expectation is zero. But this does not mean that $E(X)=0,$ nor that these considerations will help you in evaluating $P[Y\ne 0|X=0]$.
Oct
10
comment Semigroup question
what about "constant transformation"?
Oct
10
comment Relation between a random variable and its conditional expectation
"when $X=0$ its conditional expectation is 0 too"... whose conditional expectation?
Oct
10
awarded  Yearling
Jun
27
comment Existence of measures assigning positive values to all open sets
At least if $K$ is a topological group, the answer is yes: Haar measure on $K$.
Jun
13
answered showing a set is not a subgroup
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
12
suggested suggested edit on Set of all injective functions $A\to A$
May
12
answered Error analysis - Bisection algorithm
May
11
comment How to prove the Closed map lemma
Also, you should replace "sequence" with "net" since you don't assume metrizability. The argument works all the same.
May
11
revised Proving that an embedding $G \hookrightarrow BC(G)$ is continuous.
I added a bit more of information
May
11
comment Exponential group?
;) You cannot go very far without it.
May
11
comment Exponential group?
You can have nonabelian groups. The main problem is that $\uparrow$ is not associative.
May
11
answered Proving that an embedding $G \hookrightarrow BC(G)$ is continuous.
May
11
revised How to approach convergence $n!/n^n$ to infinity
TeX added
May
11
answered How to approach convergence $n!/n^n$ to infinity
May
11
suggested suggested edit on How to approach convergence $n!/n^n$ to infinity
May
11
answered Probability rules with two conditionals only