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Jan
7
awarded  Excavator
Jan
7
revised Why does Benford's Law (or Zipf's Law) hold?
trivial invisible edit to re-render dollar signs properly.
Jan
7
suggested suggested edit on Why does Benford's Law (or Zipf's Law) hold?
Dec
19
awarded  Commentator
Dec
19
comment Boggle letter probability
+1 Good points. If your first approximation tells you to put 'A' on 6 faces, I suspect you don't want to paint all six faces of one die with the letter 'A'. That would make it impossible to form words with more than one 'a' in them, such as "attack".
Dec
19
revised How many arguments are there in a Merkle tree?
generalize to the non-perfect binary tree
Dec
10
comment Terminology, mapping a tree to a tree
This reminds me a little bit of some implementations of the rope data structure, where each non-leaf node stores pointers to the left-part and the right-part of the string it represents, and also stores the weight of the "string" it represents (the total of the weight of the left-part and the right-part), and several different ropes can share some of their leaves and (in some cases) a few of their non-leaf nodes.
Dec
10
comment Terminology, mapping a tree to a tree
This reminds me a little bit of a Huffman tree -- the "frequency value" of each non-leaf node in that tree is the sum of the "frequency value" of both of its immediate children, and it is also equal to the sum of all the "frequency values" of every leaf directly or indirectly descended from that non-leaf node.
Dec
10
answered given a hex number, how to recover the bytes?
Dec
10
answered How many arguments are there in a Merkle tree?
Sep
4
awarded  Yearling
Jun
23
answered Bézier Curve and Gravitational Pull
Jun
19
answered Property of a cryptographic function
Jun
14
revised Is every encryption a bijective function?
emphasize that "same inputs" implies something is broken
Jun
14
answered Is every encryption a bijective function?
Jun
12
comment RSA: is it easy to find the public key from the secret key?
Even if you don't know p or q, if you have the private key (n,d), the public key (n, e) is usually (n, 65537). Even when e is not 65537, e is almost always a small number (compared to d), so it almost always takes a short amount of time to find e by brute force testing all possible values.
Jun
12
comment RSA: is it easy to find the public key from the secret key?
+1 Yes, exactly. Typically the primes p and q are stored in the secret private key file. The public key (n,e) is trivial to calculate from that: n = pq, and e is usually fixed at 65537.
Apr
11
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
6
comment What constants do I need to create this specific logarithmic spiral?
Sounds fascinating. Please post a link to the first visualization you post online, even if the first version doesn't look pretty to you.
Feb
23
answered Possible to imitate a sphere with 1000 congruent polygons?