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seen Sep 19 '12 at 20:10

Please delete me.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Nov
2
comment Prove that if $a$ and $b$ are odd, coprime numbers, then $\gcd(2^a +1, 2^b +1) = 3$
Thanks, I think I will see where I can get with this.
Nov
2
comment Prove that if $a$ and $b$ are odd, coprime numbers, then $\gcd(2^a +1, 2^b +1) = 3$
Good point, I was thinking of that at first, but your right, it doesn't prove that gcd is 3
Nov
2
revised Prove that if $a$ and $b$ are odd, coprime numbers, then $\gcd(2^a +1, 2^b +1) = 3$
added 84 characters in body
Nov
2
asked Prove that if $a$ and $b$ are odd, coprime numbers, then $\gcd(2^a +1, 2^b +1) = 3$
Oct
18
comment How many ordered pairs of positive integers
@Andre: $\frac{1}{a} + \frac{1}{b} = \frac{1}{p}$
Oct
18
asked How many ordered pairs of positive integers
Oct
17
awarded  Teacher
Oct
17
answered A request for a suggestion for a mathematics talk aimed at first year and second year undergraduate students in science
Oct
6
comment Combinatorial proof help
Wow, thanks for pointing me to a geometry proof. Very interesting :D
Oct
6
accepted Combinatorial proof help
Oct
6
comment Combinatorial proof help
But we have to prove it using double counting. But yes, an algebraic proof would look nice and neat.
Oct
6
comment Combinatorial proof help
Thanks for your help :) I finished the proof a while ago, I forgot to close the question.
Oct
5
accepted Lattice Paths Question
Oct
5
awarded  Scholar
Oct
5
accepted $16$ natural numbers from $0$ to $9$, and square numbers: how to use the pigeonhole principle?
Oct
5
comment $16$ natural numbers from $0$ to $9$, and square numbers: how to use the pigeonhole principle?
Oh, okay now I think I got it. So when two products are in the same hole, the powers of this final product are all even. Hence it proves that there is always a product which forms even powers.
Oct
5
comment Lattice Paths Question
@Ross: no, (0, 1) and (1, 0) are not allowed. We can only jump in steps of (1, n)
Oct
5
asked Lattice Paths Question
Oct
3
comment $16$ natural numbers from $0$ to $9$, and square numbers: how to use the pigeonhole principle?
I'm sorry if this is a stupid question, but when we say that 16 is the total number of combinations of the 4 prime numbers we can have, we are including in that odd powers as well as even powers. So then when we get the pigeons, then say that the number of pigeons is greater than 16, then aren't we also including all the sequences with odd powers? That does not help our proof. It does not show that the number of pigeons is only greater than even power strings.