7,968 reputation
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bio website linkedin.com/in/gt6989b
location New York, NY
age 36
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Dec 17 at 4:26

Dec
17
answered Finding the mass of a cone using triple integral
Dec
9
comment Evaluate $\int_{-\infty}^\infty \frac{1}{(x^2+1)^3} dx$
@dustin did not see the tag
Dec
9
answered Evaluate $\int_{-\infty}^\infty \frac{1}{(x^2+1)^3} dx$
Dec
9
revised Integrals over a Surface Using Stokes Theorem
added 17 characters in body
Dec
9
revised Probability density function / maximum likelihood for correlating sequence
LaTeX
Dec
9
revised Solving a first order nonlinear PDE
added 70 characters in body
Dec
9
comment Integrals over a Surface Using Stokes Theorem
What are your thoughts on the problem? Please explain what you tried and we will be happy to provide hints
Dec
9
revised Integrals over a Surface Using Stokes Theorem
LaTeX
Dec
9
revised Why is this true? (sum of 2 uniform distributions)
added 621 characters in body
Dec
9
comment Why is this true? (sum of 2 uniform distributions)
moved the comment into the answer for readability
Dec
9
revised Solve $y''-xy=0$ about the ordinary point $x=0$
edited title
Dec
9
answered Why is this true? (sum of 2 uniform distributions)
Dec
9
revised Finding exact value of trigonometric functions
LaTeX
Dec
9
revised is a number of the below form ever a perfect square
added 6 characters in body
Dec
8
answered Find a closed form for the generating function for each sequence below
Dec
8
comment Find a closed form for the generating function for each sequence below
Are these finite or infinite? (1) seems right to me...
Dec
8
revised Find a closed form for the generating function for each sequence below
added 8 characters in body
Dec
8
comment Prove this relation
i am not saying this suffices to show that (3,5) is unique; i said, showing (3.5) is unique suffices to solve the problem, since we now can assume $y>0$...
Dec
8
comment Prove this relation
Another one is just as easy: since $y^2 \geq 0$, we must have $x>0$, and the problem is symmetric in $y$, i.e. if $(x,y)$ is a solution, then $(x,-y)$ is a solution as well. Hence, let's look for $y \geq 0$ and it suffices to show that $(3,5)$ is a unique solution.
Dec
8
comment Prove this relation
One observation is that $y$ is even if and only if $x$ is even, but if $y=2m,x=2n$ we have $4m^2+2 = 8n^3$, which happens if and only if $2m^2+1 = 4n^3$, which cannot be since LHS is odd while RHS is even. Hence, neither $x$ nor $y$ can be even...