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16h
comment What is the probability that I have seen every time on the clock?
Why 3600 different times?
2d
comment Hamming distance of a CRC
Most CRC polynomials that I am familiar with are the product of one primitive polynomial (in the coding theory sense of the name) and $D+1$ or just a primitive polynomial (typically lengths 32 or more). Could you tell us which ones you know that are the product of two irreducible polynomials? (I am aware that $D+1$ is an irreducible polynomial; let's exclude that from this request for more information.)
Aug
27
comment Probability of Detection and pulse-pulse decorrelation time
@JyrkiLahtonen The frst question is about assumptions in Swering models. I think that it is more likely that someone with knowledge of the Swerling models will be found on dsp.SE than on stats.SE. The second question "What do I do about it?" might find a better answer on stats.SE but the question has likely been looked at already in the radar literature, and the person who knows about Swerling models might be able to tell the OP where to find the answer. That being said, if stats.SE wants the question, give it to them.
Aug
25
comment Generating points from 2 Normal distributions and $0$-probability continuous r.v.s
Do we get to see the locations (though not the colors) of all $2000$ points and have to answer the question about one of them, or are you going to show just one point $3.213$, say, and ask "What's the probability that this is a green point?"
Aug
25
comment How to find the degrees of freedom for a chi-square variable
Do you remember where you read the quoted sentence? If so, could you (i) tell us the source of your quotation and (ii) verify that the quoted sentence has been correctly transcribed into your question? Thanks.
Aug
24
comment Parity check Matrix for Plotkin construction of linear codes
@JyrkiLahtonen "...won't be pretty." Actually, it is pretty unless you are wanting a systematic code and systematic matrices. See my answer below.
Aug
24
answered Parity check Matrix for Plotkin construction of linear codes
Aug
24
comment Probability of Detection and pulse-pulse decorrelation time
I would recommend asking the moderators to move this question to dsp.SE or electronics.SE. You can contact the moderators by clicking on the flag link below your question.
Aug
24
comment How can it be shown that $d \leq n-k+1$ in a $[n,k,d]$ linear code?
Hint: write the generator matrix of the code in systematic form $G = \left[I\mid P\right]$ and stare very hard at that last row of $G$ (which is a codeword, in case you had forgotten). What is the maximum possible weight of this codeword over all possible choices of $P$?
Aug
24
comment uniform distribution, probability
Second step: Delete from your mind whatever negative thoughts you might have about unhelpful responses from people on this forum, and return to the First step..
Aug
23
revised Understanding degrees of freedom in relation to rank for $\sum_{i=1}^{n}(y_i-\bar{y})^2$
added 8 characters in body
Aug
23
answered Understanding degrees of freedom in relation to rank for $\sum_{i=1}^{n}(y_i-\bar{y})^2$
Aug
17
comment CDF of Euclidean distance between two points.
Most people distinguish between the circle $C_0$ -- the set of all points at distance $R$ from the origin -- and the disc which is the set of all points at distance less than $R$ (or less than or equal to $R$) from the origin. Which do you mean? Because with the usual meaning of circle, all the random points are at distance exactly $R$ from the origin!
Aug
17
comment Why do we not have to prove definitions?
@Zduff So by definition if k is an integer, n is an even number if n = 2k. No proof required, because it's clear enough that most people agree? Actually, what you have is a definition, the definition of an even integer, which says "An integer $k$ is said to be an even integer if there exists another integer $n$ such that $k = 2n$" with the corollary that an integer that is not an even integer is called an odd integer.
Aug
15
answered Reed Solomon Encoding
Aug
15
comment Existence of complete sufficient statistics
Consider that it must be that $\theta < X_{(1)}$ and $X_{(n)} < 2\theta$.
Aug
15
answered Show that the random variables $Z = XY \sim N(0,\alpha^2)$.
Aug
14
revised Finding the Irreducible polynomials which are primitive as part of Coding theory course
edited body
Aug
14
comment Finding the Irreducible polynomials which are primitive as part of Coding theory course
$\mathbb F_5^2$ is a two-dimensional vector space: $\mathbb F_{5^2}$ is the finite field of 25 elements. If you need to ask what $\mathbb F_{5^2}$ is at this time with an exam coming up, you really need to go back to basics and put in a lot of study of this material.
Aug
14
comment Finding the Irreducible polynomials which are primitive as part of Coding theory course
Why 24? The field $\mathbb F_{p^n}$ has cardinality $p^n$ meaning that it has 25 elements). One of the elements is 0, the additive identity. The nonzero elements are a cyclic group under multiplication, meaning that they can be represented as $\{1,\alpha,\alpha^2,\cdots, \alpha^{p^n-2}\}$ and $\alpha^{p^n-1}=1=\alpha^0$. The order of an element $\gamma$ is the smallest positive integer $m$ such that $\gamma^m=1$, and so $\alpha$ is an element of order $p^n-1$. The order of $\alpha^k$ is $(p^n-1)/\gcd(p^n-1,k)$ which is a divisor of $p^n-1$. Hence 24, and 1,2,3,4,6,8,12.