1,195 reputation
214
bio website andrew-christianson.github.io
location Los Angeles, CA
age 22
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 12 at 17:31

Dec
1
answered Is there a way to find precision used based on margin of error in compound interest problem?
Nov
26
answered Calculating credit card charges based on provided APR, balance amount and monthly payment amount?
Nov
26
accepted On the Origin and Precise Definition of the Term 'Surd'
Nov
26
revised Derivative I do not understand: $\ln (\ln x)$
parenthesis
Nov
26
suggested suggested edit on Derivative I do not understand: $\ln (\ln x)$
Nov
21
asked On the Origin and Precise Definition of the Term 'Surd'
Nov
14
accepted Probability of conditional inequalities of random variables
Nov
14
asked Probability of conditional inequalities of random variables
Oct
24
comment How to get/approximate distance between 2 close points (given in latitude/longitude)?
Ultimately though, the formulas to calculate the precise distance (assuming a spherical earth) aren't too complex, what's your resistance to using them?
Oct
24
comment How to get/approximate distance between 2 close points (given in latitude/longitude)?
Yes, but the scaling factor won't be constant as the distance per degree of longitude varies greatly. You could find the euclidian distance between two local points and compare against that.
Oct
24
answered How to get/approximate distance between 2 close points (given in latitude/longitude)?
Oct
6
awarded  Scholar
Oct
6
accepted A Thought on Recursive Sequences
Oct
6
awarded  Student
Oct
6
comment A Thought on Recursive Sequences
@andre those are types of sequences that I led me to this thought. Probably just jumped the gun on something later in the course, but it would be cool if that property had a name. None as far as you know? Also, what are the suitable conditions?
Oct
6
asked A Thought on Recursive Sequences
Oct
3
comment Velocity word problem
@jordan but you should be able to see ex post when your result is that the velocity is 0 at all time t that something is wrong. Thus, you take a step back, assume that to be false, and try something else. Hopefully some of this advice helps. The last thing I'll add: stick with it. It seems hard because it is, but it's hard because it's worth it.
Oct
3
comment Velocity word problem
@jordan For me, the answers are: It's a point moving along a line, s(t) shows me where that point is at anytime time t. Knowing the position at every point in time means pretty much everything (velocity, acceleration, location, distance traveled, etc) follows from that. Moreover that function exists inside the logical framework of mathematics, within which I expect everything to be consistent. If I follow the rules anything that begins corresponding to reality should end corresponding to reality. Hence, you shouldn't 'know' ex ante you can't plug in h=25 before you differentiate
Oct
3
comment Velocity word problem
@jordan Math can be frustrating, it's complicated stuff. Some of us here definitely make it look easy, but that's the product of decades of constant work. If it hasn't been your focus (which isn't bad in the slightest) it's just going to be a bit harder for you. The best advice I can give you is what everyone else has said: don't think about rules, tricks, etc. Instead, try to conceptualize everything you run. Here, the function s(t) = h is good example. What does it look like? What does it tell you about the point in describes? What follows from it?
Oct
2
comment Velocity word problem
@jordan Ideally, you don't know the correct answer at the outset, only the validity and use of your tools (derivatives, algebra, etc). Then, by careful application either by the predefined 'rules' as you call them (recipes as didier or someone called them) or novel 'recipes' that nevertheless use the tools correctly, you can know completely and undoubtedly that the answer is right. To clarify: there is a way to do math properly, and it is by using the tools you have carefully so that you know every step is valid, and thus the entire result you derive is valid.