Reputation
873
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
Create new tags
Badges
8 29
Impact
~39k people reached

Jul
28
comment Is Belnap's four valued-logic a boolean algebra?
duplicate of math.stackexchange.com/questions/1354050/…
Jul
28
revised What is the definition of a Critical Point?
title change and formatting
Jul
28
suggested approved edit on What is the definition of a Critical Point?
Jul
28
comment What is the domain of $f(x)=\frac{1}{x}-\frac{1}{x}$?
Right. $a-a = 0$, for all real numbers $a$. If $a$ isn't a real number, all bets are off.
Jul
15
comment Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
@Strants — I'm not saying it can't be answered, I'm just saying "almost" is relative. By that logic, you could argue 10 is "almost" equal to 100 (compared to, for example, $-10^{100}$). And because "almost" is relative, it's not a very good question to ask on math.SE.
Jul
15
comment Can I have a logical explanation for why this number is so ridiculously close to a whole number?
@AAron — understandable. You might want to read "How do I ask a good question?" and "What topics can I ask about here?".
Jul
15
comment Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
similar question: "can you explain why $2+\sqrt[3]{\frac{1}{e^{10\pi}}}$ is almost-but-not-quite an integer?"
Jul
15
comment Can I have a logical explanation for why this number is so ridiculously close to a whole number?
@AAron — sorry, my mocking is to be taken lightly. I'm just trying to make a point about how this kind of question doesn't belong on the SE network (in my opinion). there are other sites/forums/chatrooms that would welcome your question happily.
Jul
15
comment Can I have a logical explanation for why this number is so ridiculously close to a whole number?
Similar question: "can someone explain why $2+\sqrt[3]{\frac{1}{e^{10\pi}}}$ is ridiculously close to an integer?"
Jul
15
comment Why is $e^{\pi \sqrt{163}}$ almost an integer?
I'm sorry but this is a terrible question and doesn't fit the model of SE. I'm appalled by the number of upvotes it got. To the OP: please explain what kind of answer you expect from asking why a number is what it is. Also, the (number theory) tag absolutely does not belong.
Jul
14
revised Prove the value of this infinite series
formatting
Jul
14
comment Can I have a logical explanation for why this number is so ridiculously close to a whole number?
also, the (logic) tag definitely does not belong on this question.
Jul
14
comment Can I have a logical explanation for why this number is so ridiculously close to a whole number?
It's not entirely clear what you're asking. First of all, can you rigorously define "incredibly close"? One could argue that 0 is also "incredibly close" to 262537412640768744 (compared to a very large negative number). Second, explain what kind of answer you expect from asking "why" a number is what it is.
Jul
14
suggested approved edit on Prove the value of this infinite series
Jul
11
comment How to prove this limit of derivative
Hint: show that given any $\varepsilon > 0$, there exists a $C\in\mathbb{N}$ such that whenever $c > C$, it is the case that for all $x$, $\left|\frac{f'(x)}{(1+cf(x))^2} - 0\right| < \varepsilon$.
Jul
10
comment “Negative” versus “Minus”
@alex.jordan Understandable, but put yourself in middle school students’ shoes… all their lives they’ve been told "negative" means "below zero." Also, btw, I believe in the world of mathematics education, the term "opposite" is explicitly reserved for "additive inverse" while the term "reciprocal" means "multiplicative inverse."
Jul
9
comment “Negative” versus “Minus”
because if $s=-8$ then "negative s" is a positive number.
Jul
9
comment “Negative” versus “Minus”
@alex.jordan — My eighth grade math teacher taught us to NEVER say "negative s" when referring to $-s$. Consider this: if $s=-8$, then what is "negative s"? It's positive 8. That's why we were taught to ALWAYS say "the opposite of s" and to never assume that $-s$ was a negative number.
Jul
9
comment Why can ALL quadratic equations be solved by the quadratic formula?
When you say "Isolate $x$," don't you mean the opposite? $x$ is isolated to begin with.
Jul
9
revised orders of magnitude of linear and quadratic approximations.
improved formatting