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Systems biologist.


Apr
22
revised Solving a PDE using the method of characteristics
edited body
Apr
22
asked Solving a PDE using the method of characteristics
Mar
24
revised When does the summation of a quotient equal the quotient of summations?
deleted 37 characters in body
Mar
24
answered When does the summation of a quotient equal the quotient of summations?
Mar
6
answered Fourier application in biology
Jan
17
comment The volume of the solid obtained by revolving the region bounded by $y^2=x$ and $x=2{y}$ about the $y$-axis.
The interval of integration is [0, 2], not [0, 1]; the result seems correct.
Jan
17
comment Let $a, b$ and $c$ be the lengths of the sides of an arbitrary triangle. Pick out the true statements.
What will the value of $x$ be if (i) $a=b=c$, or (ii) $a=b\gg c$?
Sep
1
awarded  Yearling
Jun
19
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
2
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
20
comment Negative real parts and of the solution of a polynomial and stable matrices
This is called "the Routh-Hurwitz criterion". For a proof, see p.78 (Theorem 11) of this book.
Nov
18
revised Problem integrating by parts $e^{-2x}$
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Nov
18
answered Problem integrating by parts $e^{-2x}$
Nov
18
comment Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
@Clash en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Nov
16
revised Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
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Nov
16
revised Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
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Nov
16
revised Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
added 286 characters in body
Nov
16
revised Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
added 120 characters in body
Nov
16
answered Proof of Convergence: Babylonian Method $x_{n+1}=\frac{1}{2}(x_n + \frac{a}{x_n})$
Nov
15
comment Elegant way to prove this inequality
You're welcome.