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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 17 at 17:23

Aug
26
comment Teaching a 4 year old maths
Not enough to be an answer, but you might want to look at something like the Charlie Rose series "The Developing Brain", which touches on recent research about children's innate counting and how that transitions into learned counting. It might help you scale your expectations and understand what some of your brother's challenges are likely to be at his age.
Jul
16
comment How to respond to “solve this equation” in a basic algebra class
@alex.jordan - UX isn't about being online either. Math education is about the experience of the students. The problem here isn't primarily about technical mathematical issues, it's about how to present math to students. I believe their expertise is useful and needed.
Jul
16
comment How to respond to “solve this equation” in a basic algebra class
May I suggest you ask this question on the UX site - this is really not fundamentally a mathematical question and their expertise is likely more relevant. And I should add I'm fairly confident they will suggest you accept an answer in any reasonable format - you are making distinctions much finer than those in the student's mental model and pedagogically this is not the appropriate time to throw more advanced concepts at them than what they are focusing on trying to learn. It's a little disconcerting that this isn't more apparent to all of you, though you seem ahead of your colleagues.
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
10
answered My sister absolutely refuses to learn math
May
6
comment A “simple” 3rd grade problem…or is it?
@KevinFegan - Force and/or rate might not be the limiting factor - could be setting up tools or something like that.
Dec
21
awarded  Critic
Nov
16
awarded  Commentator
Nov
16
comment Is there no solution to the blue-eyed islander puzzle?
The traveler can say on closer inspection they are more a blue/violet color. The next day 1000 tribesmen show up to kill themselves, which gives them a chance to realize that they can't trust the traveler. Who has ideally left town by then.
Oct
9
comment Logic nonsense/paradox
@PeterSmith - Given Tarski's result, wouldn't you pretty much have to conclude that even though people pretty consistently reason about Nixon and Dean's statements in a particular way and can and do distinguish between your two examples, and thus the sentence is not "meaningless" in some sense, it must be the case that people are simply not worrying about the complex issues of self-reference at different meta-levels and that therefore at some point their reasoning must lead to inconsistency, but is still not "meaningless" in the sense that it does convey information to other people?
Aug
9
comment What kind of “mathematical object” are limits?
@HenningMakholm - Thanks for the comments. As far as I can tell I can't learn advanced math without an apprenticeship because (in part) there is no way to learn the written mathematical language without an apprenticeship. I don't know of another field that seems to have this problem this severely.
Aug
3
comment A challenge by R. P. Feynman: give counter-intuitive theorems that can be translated into everyday language
For anyone reading this who doesn't know what they are talking about - one interpretation of the question implies that the asker can't have a second boy born on a Tuesday. Another interpretation of it gives no information about the second child. In the second case the chance the other child is a boy is 1/2. In the first case alex.jordan's first comment explains it nicely.
Aug
2
comment Why we need to know how to solve a quadratic?
A relevant XKCD hasn't been mentioned yet? xkcd.com/1050 answers fairly eloquently. Don't forget the tool-tip.
May
30
comment When is something “obvious”?
Mathematicians can only prove trivial things, because everything proven is trivial - Richard Feynman
Dec
7
answered How to explain to the layperson what mathematics is, why it's important, and why it's interesting
Sep
30
comment Formula for working out the number of dice combinations resulting in a given value
If you are using Excel, use the COMBIN function for doing the multinomial theorem.
Sep
29
awarded  Supporter
Sep
2
awarded  Student
Sep
1
comment Further question on “uncountable” Turing Machine
@Srivatsan - thank you
Sep
1
asked Further question on “uncountable” Turing Machine