Reputation
573
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
Create tags
Badges
3 16
Newest
 Caucus
Impact
~7k people reached

Mar
28
comment Proving that a sequence is increasing
Cleaner than what I had wrote. +1 :) Also, I had a small hole in my writing now that I think about it...
Mar
20
accepted Can I use Burnside's Theorem? Or should I take a different approach for this proof?
Mar
20
comment Can I use Burnside's Theorem? Or should I take a different approach for this proof?
Thank you for the response. Just to make sure I am understanding this: $3|[G : G_x]$ since $|G|= 3^3$ And we know that $|G|/|G_x|$ must be an integer, resulting in either $3^3$, $3^2$ or $3$, hence $|X'| \equiv 32 \mod 3$ meaning $|X'|$ has a strong lower bound of at least $2$ (since 32 mod 3 = 2)?
Mar
20
asked Can I use Burnside's Theorem? Or should I take a different approach for this proof?
Mar
19
accepted How do you apply an element on the left of a permutation?
Mar
19
comment How do you apply an element on the left of a permutation?
@ZachGershkoff: I was testing some small cases for a larger problem. I do not believe I am allowed to discuss the question that motivated this question, but I believe there was probably a flaw in the original question.
Mar
19
comment How do you apply an element on the left of a permutation?
Hmm, I was testing out small cases for a larger problem. After reviewing your answer and the comments, I believe the question that motivated this question has a flaw in it. I would post the original but, I do not believe I am allowed to do so. Thanks for the help!
Mar
19
asked How do you apply an element on the left of a permutation?
Mar
19
accepted What about my proof is “nonsense”?
Mar
18
answered What about my proof is “nonsense”?
Mar
18
comment What about my proof is “nonsense”?
@MikeMiller: I was thinking, that $x = ah$ for some $a \in G$ and $h \in H (\leq G)$, by closure of multiplication it has to be a member of $G$? Does this not make that much sense?
Mar
18
asked What about my proof is “nonsense”?
Mar
17
comment When does function composition commute?
I think the example is correct, but the math is wrong: $f(g(x)) = (x^2)^3 = g(f(x)) = (x^3)^2 = x^6$
Mar
16
comment Help with proving property of Rubik's cube.
@vadim123: Now that you say it, I can see it. There always exists a side that can be rotated four times for $C_2$. But you can do this to to get two other sides that don't touch $C_1$ and touch all 7 other cubicles. Thank you for the help!
Mar
16
asked Help with proving property of Rubik's cube.
Mar
14
accepted How should I continue my proof of this cycle property? (And did I make a mistake?)
Mar
14
comment How should I continue my proof of this cycle property? (And did I make a mistake?)
Also, I would edit it (except it doesn't meet the minimum 6 chars needed), but I am fairly certain you mean $x(a_i)$ not $x(a_1)$.
Mar
14
comment How should I continue my proof of this cycle property? (And did I make a mistake?)
Thanks, I get it know! Sorry for the late reply some stuff came up.
Mar
13
asked How should I continue my proof of this cycle property? (And did I make a mistake?)
Mar
1
comment Use $\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{1}{n^4} = \frac{\pi^4}{90}$ to compute $\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{(-1)^n}{n^4}$
Wait, I think I'm reading this wrong, but if $k$ is fixed, then it is either going to be $\frac{\pi^4}{90}$ or the negative of that. Do you mean $-1^n$?