Reputation
14,198
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
1 17 40
Newest
 Revival
Impact
~197k people reached

Jan
26
comment Is $[a]_R$ the same as [a]?
As the book says, $[a]_R$ is a more precise version of $[a]$ when there are several equivalence relations floating around, but I have no idea what you mean by $a/R$.
Jan
21
answered On a Simple Theorem from Hilbert's *The Foundations of Geometry*
Jan
21
revised Free Gliders for Everyone?
this is not combinatorial game theory
Jan
21
comment What is the expected number of rolls in a craps game GIVEN that the player wins?
Neither. Your P(m) is the probability that a single roll of the dice produces a total of m. It is nothing specific to craps. When I write P(player wins on m), I mean the probability that in a game of craps, the player wins AND the final roll was m.
Jan
20
comment What is the expected number of rolls in a craps game GIVEN that the player wins?
It can be computed. Once you specify a value of $m$, then all probabilities in your formula are easily computed, and the infinite series is a geometric series or similar. But then you need to weight them appropriately to get the final answer, as I have indicated.
Jan
20
comment Why do we want the Axiom of the Power Set?
Is there some reason you are asking this specifically about the Power Set axiom? Or do you have a similar question about any of the other axioms?
Jan
20
answered About Quadratic Integer
Jan
20
comment In a craps game, is the expected number of rolls to win greater for the house or the player?
This doesn't answer the question asked. The question isn't about the probability of the player (or the house) winning. The question is asking for the expected number of rolls to win, given that the player (or the house) won.
Jan
20
answered What is the expected number of rolls in a craps game GIVEN that the player wins?
Jan
20
comment In a craps game, is the expected number of rolls to win greater for the house or the player?
This doesn't answer the question asked. The question isn't about the probability of the player (or the house) winning. The question is asking for the expected number of rolls to win, given that the player (or the house) won.
Jan
20
revised Do we gain anything interesting if the stabilizer subgroup of a point is normal?
added 56 characters in body
Jan
20
comment Do we gain anything interesting if the stabilizer subgroup of a point is normal?
Yes, you are of course correct. I have corrected my answer.
Jan
8
answered Clarification in Siegel, combinatorial game theory
Jan
7
comment A Generalized Mechanism for Gale-Shapley
Okay, I guess you mean that two people will be paired up and the third leftover.
Jan
7
comment A Generalized Mechanism for Gale-Shapley
I'm confused by your example. Doesn't $n$ to be an even number? Unless you have a different definition of matching than in the classical Gale-Shapley setup.
Dec
21
awarded  Revival
Dec
18
comment Modular exponentiation commutativity in Diffie-Hellman
@jwd You have the order of operations wrong. The relevant identity for Diffie-Helman is $(r^A)^B = (r^B)^A$, not $r^{(A^B)} = r^{(B^A)}$.
Dec
18
comment What are these axioms called?
@Ovi There is no such thing as something being "really" an axiom. A set of axioms is just a starting point. Different authors may use different sets of axioms, and one author's axiom might be another author's theorem. Apparently the author of your textbook chose not to include $x+0=x$ as an axiom, but it should be derivable from the axioms that are included.
Dec
17
answered Understanding Abel-Ruffini
Dec
16
comment How to multiply in Sym(X)
@snowman You should figure out which direction your textbook/instructor wants you to do. The basic process is the same either way.