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Feb
18
comment Fractional Power Interpretation
Duplicate of math.stackexchange.com/questions/132703/…
Feb
17
answered Exponential of $\bar{z} $
Feb
13
answered is there a formula for modulo
Feb
13
answered Perfect shuffle of 52 cards
Feb
13
answered How can you find the cubed roots of i?
Feb
13
answered Expressing numbers in cartesian form
Feb
13
asked How much advantage would a Blackjack player gain by being able to see the underside of cards?
Jan
22
comment How do I convince my students that the choice of variable of integration is irrelevant?
If you want to mess with students' heads, use $e$ as a variable of integration.
Jan
21
comment If $5 \times 12 = 104$, how much is $10 \times 11$?
It also works if the base is equal to 2.
Dec
24
comment Why every prime (>3) is represented as $6k\pm1$
This sieve of "potentially prime" numbers will include all the primes (except for a finite number of small primes which are divisors of $m$), but will also include some "false positives" that aren't actually prime. We want the sieve to be as small as possible in order to minimize these "false positives".
Dec
24
comment Why every prime (>3) is represented as $6k\pm1$
For any given value of $m$, there are some numbers $n$ that can be trivially shown to be composite based only on the value of $n$ mod $m$ (or equivalently, the last digit when $n$ is written in base $m$). I call all the other natural numbers "potentially prime". For example, in familiar base-ten, the numbers 90, 92, 94, 95, 96, and 98 can be ruled out as prime based solely on their last digit. The numbers 91, 93, 97, and 99 are "potentially prime" based on their last digit, even though 97 is the only one that's really a prime.
Dec
23
answered Why every prime (>3) is represented as $6k\pm1$
Dec
19
comment Prove that this number is irrational
$a = 0.124578912456891245689123568912356890235679023567902346790234679013467801346780‌​134578013457801245780...$
Dec
16
comment Prove the lecturer is a liar…
As the number of attendees approaches infinity, $b/a$ approaches $\sqrt[3]{3} - 1$.
Dec
16
comment Prove the lecturer is a liar…
Some small approximate solutions are (8, 3) with a probability of 56/165, and (10, 4) with a probability of 30/91.
Dec
16
answered Prove the lecturer is a liar…
Dec
13
comment Travelling to the point of origin without using the same road twice
Note that's it's not true if there are only $n-1$ roads. (For example, consider 5 cities connected with 4 roads in an X-shaped graph.) What is it about adding the nth road that forces there to be a cycle?
Dec
12
answered Why does Trapezoidal Rule have potential error greater than Midpoint?
Dec
9
answered Help with standard deviation and probability
Dec
8
comment financial help. Too many numbers equal only a few. which combinations?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subset_sum_problem