762 reputation
212
bio website wiki.zbasu.net
location Grand Rapids, MI
age 21
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 17 hours ago

I am an undergraduate at Grand Valley State University.


Apr
15
comment What about generlizing grammars?
I think this question ("given some examples, how can you determine what the rule may be?") is essentially what the entire field of machine learning tries to answer. I don't know how to give a better answer than "I suggest reading a machine learning textbook".
Apr
15
comment How do I compute Euler phi function efficiently for repeated prime factors?
Note that computing the phi function may be prohibitively difficult if you don't know the number's prime factorization. If $p$ and $q$ are prime numbers, and we know what $pq$ and $\phi(pq)$ are, we can find what $p$ and $q$ are.
Apr
15
answered How do I compute Euler phi function efficiently for repeated prime factors?
Apr
13
comment Visually deceptive “proofs” which are mathematically wrong
@16807 Now, suppose that there are a million doors, with a car behind one and a door behind all the others. Monty Hall goes into a flying rage and randomly kicks down 999,998 doors, and they all happen to have goats behind them. What's the probability that the door you originally picked has a car behind it? The answer is 50%.
Apr
9
awarded  Promoter
Dec
16
comment Monty hall problem extended.
Note that this is only true if Monty intentionally chooses doors with goats. If you pick an arbitrary door, and Monty randomly opens 999,998 doors, and all of them happen to be goats, the probability of the car being behind each door is now 1/2.
Oct
18
comment Riddle: 1 question to know if the number is 1, 2 or 3
I don't agree that we know that 1/0 is not a frog. If I define 1/0 as being a certain individual frog, then my definition doesn't contradict any mathematical theorem. It's not an invalid definition; it's merely a silly and nonsensical one. And doesn't "undefined" just mean "not having a valid, agreed-upon definition"?
Oct
18
accepted If a derivative of a continuous function has a limit, must it agree with that limit?
Oct
18
comment regular expression length $\ge3$
What does "length of a regular expression" mean? If it means "length of the shortest string in the language", then the length of your expression is 1, as you've found.
Oct
18
comment the derivative of $-F_x/F_y$?
What have you tried so far? And what is $F$?
Oct
18
asked If a derivative of a continuous function has a limit, must it agree with that limit?
Oct
8
answered What is the intuition behind the “par” operator in linear logic?
Aug
2
revised Can the golden ratio accurately be expressed in terms of e and $\pi$
Add annotations for how accurate these are
Aug
2
comment Can the golden ratio accurately be expressed in terms of e and $\pi$
On my machine, $e - \sqrt[3]\pi$ is about 1.254, which doesn't seem like a very good approximation.
Aug
2
suggested suggested edit on Can the golden ratio accurately be expressed in terms of e and $\pi$
Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jun
14
accepted In linear logic (a sequent calculus), can $\Gamma \vdash \Delta$ and $\Sigma \vdash \Pi$ be combined to get $\Gamma, \Sigma \vdash \Delta, \Pi$?
Jun
12
comment How to interpret “computable real numbers are not countable, and are complete”?
Well, it seems to me like most of the paper makes sense if you define "mathematics" as something like "the study of the behavior of computer programs"—*real* computer programs, running on actual computers, not on Turing machines. Adjusting other terms appropriately, the computable real numbers are "uncountable" in a sense (you can't write a computer program that lists each one exactly once), and "complete" in a sense (since all we're talking about is computer programs, we're denying the existence of uncountable real numbers). I have no idea if this is what Wildberger actually had in mind.
Jun
12
asked In linear logic (a sequent calculus), can $\Gamma \vdash \Delta$ and $\Sigma \vdash \Pi$ be combined to get $\Gamma, \Sigma \vdash \Delta, \Pi$?
Jun
5
comment $\frac{1}{x-a} + \frac{1}{x-b} + \frac{1}{x-c} = 0 $ has precisely two real roots
Have you tried graphing the function $f(x) = 1/(x - a) + 1/(x - b) + 1/(x - c)$?