1,570 reputation
417
bio website
location Grand Rapids, MI
age 22
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jan 27 at 17:34

I am a recent graduate of Grand Valley State University.


Jan
23
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
22
awarded  Mortarboard
Jan
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
21
answered Why can a circle be described by an equation but not by a function?
Jan
19
answered What do mathematicians mean by “equipped”
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
answered Is there a law that you can add or multiply to both sides of an equation?
Dec
8
comment How to prove this polynomial has an imaginary root?
I've spent a couple of minutes trying to think how to answer this question. I don't see how to prove that it's not the case that all of its roots are real. My only thought is the fact that by Descartes' rule of signs, not all of its roots are positive.
Sep
25
comment Is it true to say that “it's not logically possible to prove something can't be done”?
It looks like you're interpreting Asok's "can't be done" as "can't be proved within a formal system". I don't see any evidence that Asok is talking about formal systems; what's your reasoning?
Sep
2
answered Having hard time understanding proofs by contradiction.
Aug
31
comment How many subsets does the set $\{1, 2, \dots , n\}$ have that contain no two consecutive integers if $1$ and $n$ also count as consecutive?
Well, it's the number of subsets that don't contain two consecutive integers, minus the number of subsets that don't contain two consecutive integers but do contain both $1$ and $n$.
Aug
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
12
comment Proof of Existence of Algebraic Closure: Too simple to be true?
Answer to first question: "A is strictly smaller than B" means that there is no surjective function from A to B. Answer to second question: yes, it is; this shows that the collection of algebraic extensions of $K$ is not a small class.
Aug
12
answered Proof of Existence of Algebraic Closure: Too simple to be true?
Aug
12
answered Irrational numbers in reality
Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
This is Leibniz's Law of Continuity, right?
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
I wonder how "obvious" this is among people who know how the real numbers are actually defined.
Jun
9
comment 'Obvious' theorems that are actually false
By "chain", do we mean a collection of subsets of N that is totally ordered by the subset relation? You can represent the interval $[0, 1]$ as such a chain. For each number $x$ in that interval, the subset contains (rounding down) the first $9x$ one-digit numbers, the first $90x$ two-digit numbers, the first $900x$ three-digit numbers, and so on.