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seen Jun 26 at 23:05

Mar
30
comment Examples of mathematical results discovered “late”
... So if a third point lies in $l'$, repeat to get two points line joining which has the closest point at even lower non-zero $\delta''$. Since there are finitely many lines with 2 points from the set, this has to stop somewhere, there are two points which have no other point on the line joining them. Incredible proof.
Mar
30
answered Examples of mathematical results discovered “late”
Oct
31
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
19
answered Demystify integration of $\int \frac{1}{x} dx$
Sep
10
answered Convergeny Again - Direct Comparison
Sep
10
answered Blue eyes: a logic puzzle
Aug
30
comment What are some uses for other norms on $\mathbb{R}^n$
Ahh. Man. I meant rotation invariant. It is so because the map $(x,y)\to (x\cos(\theta)+y\sin(\theta),-x\sin(\theta)+y\cos(\theta))$ will preserve distance between any $(x_1,y_1)$, $(x_2,y_2)$, only with the $L^2$ norm.
Aug
30
comment Expected size of the largest cycle
Well yes I was talking about random permutations - thanks! But you didn't put it as an answer... how do I add reputation to you? Will upvoting your comment do it?
Aug
29
comment Can a number ever *really* be irrational?
The question perhaps deserves more positive attention than it is getting, because almost certainly there are no rational numbers. Or with probability $1$, a number that you pick uniformly from $[a,b]$ with $a < b$, will be an irrational number. May be that's something you realized intuitively, which is why you are asking the question. However, zero-probability events do still exist - as do rational numbers. It is strange though, to think that most numbers we deal with come from a set of zero length (or Lebesgue measure)!
Aug
29
answered What are some uses for other norms on $\mathbb{R}^n$
Aug
29
revised How do I know if a sufficient statistic is also complete?
added 87 characters in body
Aug
29
revised How do I know if a sufficient statistic is also complete?
added 702 characters in body
Aug
29
answered How do I know if a sufficient statistic is also complete?
Aug
29
answered The integral of $\frac{\cos(x)}{x}$ from $0$ to $1$
Aug
29
comment Probability and Stats
Yeah - it's easy to get into and becomes very interesting. Probability theory, one of the best branches of maths! Good luck Adib.
Aug
29
asked Expected size of the largest cycle
Aug
29
revised Probability and Stats
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Aug
29
answered Probability and Stats
Aug
18
awarded  Yearling