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May
18
comment Deciding which questions to do in a maths exam
In a university or school exam, you should read the whole test before starting on the problems.
May
17
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Derivative of $\Gamma$ at $1$
May
16
revised Another differential topology lemma
rolled back to a previous revision
May
16
revised Another differential topology lemma
rolled back to a previous revision
May
16
awarded  Cleanup
May
16
revised A differential topology lemma
rolled back to a previous revision
May
2
comment Why does the Mandelbrot set contain (slightly deformed) copies of itself?
There are some references for this business about $M$ at $c$ resembling $J_c$ here: math.stackexchange.com/questions/32062/…
Mar
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I prove that the sequence $\frac{n}{n^2+1}$ is convergent?
Mar
24
revised How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
Fixed a mistake
Mar
24
comment How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
@youler - The Poincare conjecture follows from the classification of (spherical) space forms which in turn follows from geometrization. Perelman really did deserve that Fields medal!
Mar
23
awarded  Custodian
Mar
23
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Partial Fractions - $\frac{x^3}{x^2 + 12x +36}$
Mar
22
revised How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
Tightened up one of the answers. Added a case to another.
Mar
22
comment How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
Good point. I'll edit that. Thanks.
Mar
22
comment Finiteness of a compact subset in $\mathbb R^n$
This is an exercise. Hint - use the hypothesis to construct an open cover, then use compactness.
Mar
22
revised How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
added 135 characters in body
Mar
22
revised How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
fixed typesetting, added links, added moral
Mar
22
answered How can I understand the three-dimensional space forms?
Feb
13
comment Quasi-isometric embedding and Quasi-isometry
Sure. I think that a closed interval is simpler than a Cantor set. De gustibus non est disputandum. :)
Feb
13
comment Quasi-isometric embedding and Quasi-isometry
Similar, but just a bit simpler: take $X$ to be a half hyperbolic disk and take $Y$ to be the union of an infinite ray and a copy of $X$, gluing the origin of the ray to a point of the material boundary of $X$.