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Mar
25
comment Why does the condition of a function being differentiable always require an open domain?
Whoa gosh, old question. My point was that if you take a function which isn't differentiable at $0$ and restrict it to $(0,1)$, then it might look just like some other function that is differentiable at $0$ (i.e. $|x|$ vs $x$). I claim that makes for a poor choice of definition because differentiability at a point ought to be consistent amongst every extension of a function around that point, not that no extensions should exist where it is differentiable.
Feb
26
revised Can someone explain Cayley's Theorem step by step?
added 7 characters in body
Feb
26
revised Can someone explain Cayley's Theorem step by step?
rolled back to a previous revision
Feb
26
revised Can someone explain Cayley's Theorem step by step?
well if we're makin stuff $\phi$ we should make it all $\phi$
Feb
7
reviewed Close Show that the equation $4x=y^2+z^2+1$ has no integer solution
Feb
7
comment Numbers $a$ that are the sum of the fractional parts $\{x^2\} + \{x\}$ for some $x$
@RobertSoupe How bout $0$ and $0$?
Feb
7
reviewed Leave Open Numbers $a$ that are the sum of the fractional parts $\{x^2\} + \{x\}$ for some $x$
Feb
6
reviewed Close Determine value $b$ in $f(x)=ab^x$ given the following data points
Feb
6
reviewed Close Measure Theoretic Probability: convergence almost surely
Feb
6
revised The degree of a polynomial which also has negative exponents.
added 4 characters in body
Feb
5
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
5
revised Checking that a $3$-D diagram is commutative
edited tags
Feb
5
revised The degree of a polynomial which also has negative exponents.
edited tags
Feb
5
comment The degree of a polynomial which also has negative exponents.
Thanks, this is surely a more natural setting than a Laurent series.
Feb
5
revised The degree of a polynomial which also has negative exponents.
Removed irrelevant information. Alex, you dang algebra fan boy, that does not have anything to do with the question.
Feb
3
revised quotient group G/N order and isomorphic group
added 10 characters in body
Feb
3
comment quotient group G/N order and isomorphic group
@singularity The other answerer gave you the answer, so, look at that answer and then look at my hint again. The system is exactly to construct the map that sends the normal subgroup to the identity. If you review this case until you understand how this is done, then compare to another example, you will understand how to find other answers of this kind on a test. You don't have to guess the map at all: it is as simple as it can possibly be. You just change what needs to be changed to get what you want. Consider this deeply and you will understand.
Feb
3
revised quotient group G/N order and isomorphic group
deleted 53 characters in body
Feb
3
answered quotient group G/N order and isomorphic group
Feb
1
reviewed Reopen Set of roots of sum is equal to the intersection