raxacoricofallapatorius

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"All the disputes that for so many generations have vexed philosophers are destroyed by visible certainty, and we are liberated from wordy arguments."


Apr
11
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
5
awarded  Informed
Apr
4
asked Intuition about the where the beta distribution has its maximum
Feb
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
9
answered Using “we have” in maths papers
Jan
9
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
27
revised On “familiarity” (or How to avoid “going down the Math Rabbit Hole”?)
Link to related question about von Neumann's quote.
Dec
27
suggested suggested edit on On “familiarity” (or How to avoid “going down the Math Rabbit Hole”?)
Jun
22
awarded  Yearling
May
25
accepted Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
May
25
comment Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
Thanks. This qualifies as my most embarrassing question (among many). That's exactly the text I'm using, and I somehow missed Domain Closure (we've never actually had occasion to use it; that's my excuse, anyway).
May
25
revised Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
Clarify semantics used.
May
25
comment Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
I'm probably not asking the question quite right. I'm assuming that all I've got is Herbrand, and I don't have things that look like "$x=a$". Is there a way, in Herbrand, to accomplish this in the case where the "names" and the objects correspond, i.e. $a$, $b$, and $c$ are all that there is in the universe, and I know that all of them are $p$ objects? Isn't $\forall x.p(x)$ entailed in that case?
May
25
revised Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
Clarify introduction to question.
May
25
asked Universal introduction with a limited vocabulary
May
11
revised How do I subtract times?
Fix title.
May
7
awarded  Caucus
May
1
accepted In Fitch, is a symbol not in a specified language automatically free?
May
1
comment In Fitch, is a symbol not in a specified language automatically free?
So for any symbol $\xi\not\in\{a,b\}$, $q(\xi)$ and $\forall\xi.q(\xi)$, for example, are equivalent and mean "for any symbol $\xi$, regardless of whether it is in $\Delta$"? And thus, is the example I added to the original question correct?
May
1
revised In Fitch, is a symbol not in a specified language automatically free?
Add example.