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Jun
4
comment What does .9 with a line above the 9 mean?
@user1717828 totally random, I didn't feel like going to the trouble of looking up a "significant" fraction.
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
3
answered What does .9 with a line above the 9 mean?
May
27
awarded  Notable Question
May
24
comment During a night, each chameleon changes its colour to one of the other four colours with equal probability.
@Idonknow but chameleon 3 could also change to one of the colors from $A_1$...
May
24
comment During a night, each chameleon changes its colour to one of the other four colours with equal probability.
How did you come up with $\frac{2}{4}\times\frac{1}{4}\times\frac{1}{4}$?
May
14
comment Confusion about the null (empty) set being contained in other sets
Out of curiosity, why did you think the null set can't be an element of any set?
Apr
23
comment Prove that there is no smallest positive real number
I'm no mathematician, but I don't see how the method you describe in this answer isn't a proof by contradiction.
Apr
20
comment How many scientists can survive?
@zahbaz in practice: "3 point... one?" smbc-comics.com/index.php?id=1777 Though I suppose you only need one of them to know more...
Apr
20
comment Difficult integration
Well, what makes you so convinced that $\nabla$ represents the generalization of the gradient rather than the gradient itself, $(\partial_x, \partial_y, \partial_z)$? Note that if you were working with the operator $(\partial_x, \partial_y, \partial_z, \frac{1}{c}\partial_t)$, you would probably also be working in Minkowski space, where the scalar product is $a\cdot b = \pm(a_x b_x + a_y b_y + a_z b_z - a_t b_t)$ (the $\pm$ is a choice of convention).
Apr
19
answered Difficult integration
Apr
15
comment Is the Banach-Tarski paradox realistic? Why is Volume not an invariant?
Honestly, I don't think the contribution of binding energy to mass is really relevant here. One could easily imagine performing set operations in a universe where there is no binding energy, if that would make a difference. I think your last paragraph gets to the point better.
Apr
9
comment Is $\exp(x)$ the same as $e^x$?
Yes, I'm with @Hrodelbert: the statement that "exp" is preferred in physics seems unjustified.
Mar
2
comment Particles that are distinguishable and indistiguishable at the same time
Since this question was in the process of being reviewed for migration, I'm canceling the bounty for now.
Feb
13
comment Calculation of triple integrals like $ \int_{V'} \frac{ \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'}}{\mid \mathbf{r} - \mathbf{r'} \mid ^3} dV' $, on spherical domain
Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
Jan
30
comment Is the Law of Large Numbers empirically proven?
@user1891836 (3 comments up) in the frequentist interpretation, that is more or less the definition of probability.
Jan
26
accepted Is there a known simple mental approximation to a hypergeometric distribution?
Jan
23
comment What's your favorite proof accessible to a general audience?
You can rework this into an estimate of the amount of time since any two people in the world have shared a common ancestor. Not a great estimate since incest (your definition, not the legal definition) makes it impossible to say for sure, but I think that's much more likely to appeal to lots of people who don't consider themselves mathematically inclined.
Jan
10
comment What are good programs for writing expressions?
LaTeX is both a markup language and a program (which converts that markup language into something like PDF). I get the argument that LaTeX the program seems like overkill for this task (though I don't generally agree with it), but LaTeX the markup language is perfectly suited. I presume this question is asking about the program, rather than the markup language.
Jan
7
comment Is arrow notation for vectors “not mathematically mature”?
I really can't agree with this, since you seem to be implicitly asserting that the arrow notation can only be used to represent an element of $\mathbb{R}^n$ (perhaps even specifically $\mathbb{R}^3$). As far as I know, that's not the case.