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Feb
16
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
11
revised Maths question from an IQ test
edited tags
Feb
10
comment Comparing $\pi^{e}$ and $e^{\pi}$
@NikolajK: Thank you for the suggestion! Done.
Feb
10
revised Comparing $\pi^{e}$ and $e^{\pi}$
added 48 characters in body
Feb
9
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
comment Irrational numbers in reality
@AsafKaragila: Thanks! Did not know the 60 day thing. The flag was declined with a comment that this is not about physics (which I disagree with) and it is too late to migrate (they didn't mention the 60 day thing).
Jan
30
revised Convergent or Divergent? $\sum_{n=1}^\infty\bigl(2^{\frac1{n}}-1\bigr)$
added 64 characters in body
Jan
30
comment Convergent or Divergent? $\sum_{n=1}^\infty\bigl(2^{\frac1{n}}-1\bigr)$
@DepeHb: Uh. You are right! Thanks for pointing that out. That is easily fixed, fortunately (take $\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}$ instead)...
Jan
29
comment Help with $\lim_{x\rightarrow +\infty} (x^2 - \sqrt{x^4 - x^2 + 1})$
You are welcome.
Jan
29
revised Proving that $\sin1 $(radian) is irrational without using Taylor Series Expansion.
edited tags
Jan
29
comment Proving that $\sin1 $(radian) is irrational without using Taylor Series Expansion.
btw, if it was $\sin 1^{\circ}$, the proof would be easy: $\sin 45^{\circ}$ is a polynomial in $\sin 1^{\circ}$ with rational (in fact, integer) coefficients! Since $\sin 45^{\circ}$ is irrational...
Jan
29
answered Proving that $\sin1 $(radian) is irrational without using Taylor Series Expansion.
Jan
29
revised Proving that $\sin1 $(radian) is irrational without using Taylor Series Expansion.
edited tags
Jan
29
comment Irrational numbers in reality
This is not a mathematical question. Seems like you found a bug around getting close votes by offering a bounty :-) I have flagged for migration to physics.se, so let's see.
Jan
27
comment Can't figure out $O(n \log n)$ divide-and-conquer algorithm
You could implement so it is $\Omega(n \log n)$ instead of $O(n)$ though...
Jan
27
revised Can't figure out $O(n \log n)$ divide-and-conquer algorithm
edited tags
Jan
27
comment Can't figure out $O(n \log n)$ divide-and-conquer algorithm
This is the famous maximum sum subarray problem...