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2d
comment If $(a_n)$ is a decreasing sequence of strictly positive numbers and if $\sum{a_n}$ is convergent, show that $\lim{na_n}=0$
How did you show $\lim_{n\to\infty}na_n$ exist?
Feb
8
revised Derivative of trace of matrix
tr -> \mathrm{tr}, use align environment
Feb
8
suggested approved edit on Derivative of trace of matrix
Feb
8
revised Derivative of trace of matrix
<> -> \langle\rangle
Feb
8
suggested approved edit on Derivative of trace of matrix
Jan
29
comment Why is a vector function not smooth if $r'=0$
It's like you walk, stop, and (probably turn and) walk again. There will a singularity in the route.
Jan
17
comment Laplace, Legendre, Fourier, Hankel, Mellin, Hilbert, Borel, Z…: unified treatment of transforms?
@Startwearingpurple Can separable Hilbert space have uncountable orthonormal basis?
Jan
15
revised Different versions of Mercer's theorem
deleted 1 character in body
Jan
15
asked Different versions of Mercer's theorem
Jan
12
revised Continuity of a Linear function
For grammar mistakes
Jan
12
comment When do matrices have positive eigenvectors?
What's a positive eigenvector?
Jan
12
suggested approved edit on Continuity of a Linear function
Jan
12
revised When do matrices have positive eigenvectors?
For grammar mistakes
Jan
12
suggested approved edit on When do matrices have positive eigenvectors?
Jan
11
revised About sequential weak closure in $\ell^2$
Texified the title; <> t0 langle/rangle
Jan
11
comment Prove that $(a-b)^n\mid (a^n-b^n) \iff n=1$ under given conditions
Why is it the hardest?
Jan
11
suggested approved edit on About sequential weak closure in $\ell^2$
Jan
11
comment Find the sum $\sum_{k=2}^n \frac{n!}{(n-k)!(k-2)!}.$
$LHS=\frac{n!}{(n-2)!}\sum_{k=0}^{n-2}\frac{(n-2)!}{(n-2-k)!k!}=n(n-1)2^{n-2}$
Jan
7
comment Show that $rank(A) \ngeq \frac{[tr(A)]^2 }{tr(A^2)}$
Does >/= mean <?
Jan
6
answered $E(X\mid X+Y)$, where $X$ and $Y$ are independent $U(0,1)$.