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Mar
7
comment What was the first bit of mathematics that made you realize that math is beautiful? (For children's book)
Which proof of $\sqrt{2}$ being irrational?
Feb
28
comment In a group $G$ with operation $\star$, can I apply $\star$ to both sides of an equation?
@GerryMyerson I meant that if you went from $a=b$ to $a^2=b^2$, you can don't lose any information because you still have the two equations.
Feb
28
comment In a group $G$ with operation $\star$, can I apply $\star$ to both sides of an equation?
@GerryMyerson Isn't going from $a^2=b^2$ to $a=b$ the same as $a^2=b^2\implies a=b^2/a$, and because $a=b$, $\implies a=b^2/b=b$.
Feb
27
accepted In a group $G$ with operation $\star$, can I apply $\star$ to both sides of an equation?
Feb
27
asked In a group $G$ with operation $\star$, can I apply $\star$ to both sides of an equation?
Feb
25
awarded  Excavator
Feb
25
revised what is difference between a ring and a field
Added abelian group, formatted into a list.
Feb
25
suggested approved edit on what is difference between a ring and a field
Feb
15
revised Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
edited tags
Feb
14
revised Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
added additional info on 2nd line.
Feb
14
comment Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
Thanks, this is a great way to prove it without induction!
Feb
14
suggested approved edit on Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
Feb
14
accepted Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
Feb
14
revised Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
edited body
Feb
14
asked Proving $4^{47}\equiv 4\pmod{12}$
Jan
21
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
22
accepted Evaluating $\sum\limits_{n=0}^{20} \frac{(-1)^{n}2^{n+1}}{3^{n}},$
Sep
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
22
comment When representing a base-n number in decimal ($\frac{x}{n^l}$), will there be a different set of terminating representable numbers than base-10?
Both mean the same thing. If there's a different set of terminating numbers there will also be a set of non-terminating numbers. Correct?
Jun
22
comment When representing a base-n number in decimal ($\frac{x}{n^l}$), will there be a different set of terminating representable numbers than base-10?
You confirm my revised suspicion: the set of representable non-terminating numbers does depend on the base. Thanks!