Reputation
2,103
Top tag
Next privilege 2,500 Rep.
Create tag synonyms
Badges
2 20 25
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~91k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 64 votes cast
Jul
20
awarded  Yearling
May
24
comment Can a function be continuous at the end points of its (closed interval) domain?
Can you please give a reference for this, or an explanation for why this should be the case?
May
23
asked Can a function be differentiable at the end points of its (closed interval) domain?
May
23
asked Can a function be continuous at the end points of its (closed interval) domain?
Jan
29
awarded  Good Question
Jan
28
awarded  Favorite Question
Nov
3
comment Explanation of method for showing that 0 / 0 is undefined
I see that this comment was made four years ago, but I said that I would revise or defend my position on the basis of comments. So, could a simple example be provided of one particular part of mathematics that would be broken as a result?
Oct
31
awarded  Good Question
Oct
20
comment Why must the base of a logarithm be a positive real number not equal to 1?
This doesn't answer the question about why the base of the logarithm cannot be negative.
Oct
16
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
10
accepted If all vectors in a set are perpendicular to a given vector, is the set linearly dependent?
Oct
8
comment If all vectors in a set are perpendicular to a given vector, is the set linearly dependent?
Hmmm, I should have specified that I was considering three vectors over three dimensions, or two vectors over two dimensions. Not sure whether I should edit the question or pose a new one. (Although my reason for suspecting it to be true is now looking dubious, so perhaps I should just ask for a counterexample to the conjecture.)
Oct
8
asked If all vectors in a set are perpendicular to a given vector, is the set linearly dependent?
Jul
20
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
19
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
29
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
9
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
30
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
8
comment What's the explanation for why n^2+1 is never divisible by 3?
I like the first three paragraphs, although I'd start the first with "For any integer $n$,". Why not conclude with "Thus, for any value of $n$, either $n^2$ or $n^2 - 1$ is a multiple of three, so the next multiple of three above $n^2$ is either $n^2+2$ or $n^2+3$."?