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18
awarded  Good Answer
May
29
revised How find the number of $z$,such that$ |a^2-b^2-b+1|\le 10$
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May
29
answered How find the number of $z$,such that$ |a^2-b^2-b+1|\le 10$
May
28
answered Evaluate integral in terms of Gamma function
May
24
revised Grover Algorithm Orthogonal vectors
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May
24
comment Grover Algorithm Orthogonal vectors
Sorry, I made a mistake. I meant that $\omega$ and $s'$ are orthogonal. My answer is hopefully fixed. I don't understand the question "how I will be able to define $\sqrt{N}|\omega\rangle$". It's just multiplication, right? One should know how to multiply vectors by numbers.
May
24
answered Grover Algorithm Orthogonal vectors
May
7
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Feb
3
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Feb
3
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Dec
15
answered Fourier transform vs Fourier series
Dec
9
comment Rotation matrix in terms of axis of rotation
It's just a conjugation of the simple matrix for a rotation around the $z$-axis, which is effectively just 2 x 2 matrix, by another rotational matrix that rotates the North pole to the point $V$, which is a product of rotation in the theta-direction and the phi-direction to get where you need to get. Conjugation by $U$ is $URU^{-1}$ where the product is matrix product. It's possible ineffective to write these things without matrices so if you don't know matrices, this is a reason to learn them. At any rate, it's not really physics, it's linear algebra and geometry and a basic one.
Dec
2
comment Kummer's Equation
Dear Alex, the equation for $L_n$ is nothing else than a coefficient in front of $t^n$ in the Taylor expansion of the equation for $g$ with respect to $t$. You just compare the terms term-by-term. Please just expand my equation for $g$ as a Taylor expansion in $t$ and don't ask any more questions.
Dec
2
answered Kummer's Equation
Sep
21
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18
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22
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Jun
22
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May
23
comment A general pattern to find the roots of the classical lie algebras
Sorry, your updated question got very confusing. I was answering your original question. The new question talks about "levels" etc. There aren't levels in ordinary Lie algebras. The roots are very simple objects and be sure I could easily enumerate all of them for all 7 classes of the Lie algebras, A,B,C,D,E,F,G. They're just the non-negative integral combinations of the simple roots that have the right length (either the same as simple roots or, in non-simply-laced groups, sqrt2 or sqrt3 times longer). ... If you have an algebra, the roots are just defined as the eigenvalues under the Cartan.
May
23
answered A general pattern to find the roots of the classical lie algebras