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Jun
28
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
15
answered How to find nonnegative solutions of a linear system?
Jun
9
comment Solve the differential equation (if exact): $(5x + 4y)dx + (4x - 8y^3)dy = 0$
This was done under the assumption that exactness has already been tested and found. You can just throw in the constant on the right hand side.
Jun
9
answered multiply two vectors (neither dot product nor cross product)
Jun
9
answered Solve the differential equation (if exact): $(5x + 4y)dx + (4x - 8y^3)dy = 0$
Jun
9
comment If the equation is exact, solve: $(2x-1)dx + (3y+7)dy = 0$
@DarthVoid: Yes, thats what it means.
Jun
9
answered If the equation is exact, solve: $(2x-1)dx + (3y+7)dy = 0$
Jun
8
comment A planar graph on $n \geq 3$ vertices has at most $3n-6$ edges: is the converse true?
@MichaelGaluza: I think it is easy to see that the graph is planar if you draw a square inside another square and make four more edges. No need to use any other result.
Jun
8
answered A planar graph on $n \geq 3$ vertices has at most $3n-6$ edges: is the converse true?
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
added 6 characters in body
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
updated thanks to bof
Jun
8
reviewed Approve Surface area using integration.
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
8
revised Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
added 155 characters in body
Jun
8
answered Nonisomorphic connected 2-regular graphs
May
7
comment Minimum possible number of vertices in a tree with restrictions on vertex degree
One can add that if we have a sequence of numbers satisfying the handshaking lemma for a tree then it is always realizable.
May
7
comment Minimum possible number of vertices in a tree with restrictions on vertex degree
Hint: Consider a tree with 1994 vertices where all but the 22 mentioned vertices are of degree 1.
May
7
comment Is there an intuitive, not-too-mathematical way of thinking about limit points?
You can interpret a limit point as a limit of some sequence in $A$. (As you are working in $\mathbb R$ which is a metric space.) That intuitively justifies the name limit point.