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Jul
29
awarded  Popular Question
May
29
revised Trouble with geometrical application of Lagrange multiplier
rollback
May
20
comment Prime numbers stretch to infinity, but what about the distance between them?
Polignac turned out to be right: golem.ph.utexas.edu/category/2013/05/….
May
14
comment A suspicious way to conclude convergence
Yes. I thought a real divergent sequence had to go to $\pm\infty$.
May
13
accepted A suspicious way to conclude convergence
May
13
comment A suspicious way to conclude convergence
Indeed, $S$ neither converges nor diverges.
May
12
asked A suspicious way to conclude convergence
May
7
comment Is there a need for another integration technique?
Next time I'll know better than to not draw the freaking region. =D
May
6
accepted Is there a need for another integration technique?
May
6
asked Is there a need for another integration technique?
May
6
awarded  Yearling
Apr
25
awarded  Informed
Apr
22
asked Trouble with geometrical application of Lagrange multiplier
Apr
6
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
21
comment Splitting field of a slightly general polynomial
I've done exercises with $x^n-a$, $n$ and $a\neq1$ known, and indeed, the Galois group does not turn out to be abelian. Based on your answer, I have another idea: when $a$ is $1$, $\omega\mapsto\omega^k$ is invertible if and only if $k$ is invertible modulo $n$; but the set of such numbers is an abelian group, so I could argue $\mathrm{Gal}(F)\simeq\mathbb Z_n^\times$.
Sep
20
asked Splitting field of a slightly general polynomial
Jul
25
comment Finding a pair of elements to satisfy an inequation
@JackSchmidt I had an insight as soon as I read your comment. A field is a domain, and this one has at least two non-zero distinct elements. Pretty easy, I should've thought of that by myself. Thanks.
Jul
25
accepted Finding a pair of elements to satisfy an inequation
Jul
25
asked Finding a pair of elements to satisfy an inequation
Jul
24
accepted A sequence of nested fractions with a counter-intuitive limit