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Jun
21
reviewed Approve Shortcut Technique for finding Raised Binomials with Imaginary Numbers
Jun
14
awarded  Self-Learner
May
31
reviewed Approve SAT math problem about probability
May
31
reviewed Approve Roots of the equation $x^2 + px + q = 0$
May
31
reviewed Approve Is there a set $A$ such that power set of $A $ has a bijection with $\mathbb{N}$?
May
31
reviewed Approve How to write a line as the sum of a vector and a subspace?
May
28
accepted When (and why) did the convention that exponents are evaluated from right to left arise?
May
21
reviewed Approve problem about symmetric positive semi-definite matrix
May
5
awarded  Yearling
Apr
27
reviewed Approve Curious about a made-up paradox
Apr
26
comment What is this pattern called?
I love that you posted this! I stumbled across this same pattern years ago but didn't think to ask about it online. (Then again, that might have been before I knew about Math.SE.) So, thanks for doing this! :)
Apr
16
asked When (and why) did the convention that exponents are evaluated from right to left arise?
Apr
10
reviewed Approve Solve for X in a difficult exponential function
Mar
22
reviewed Approve Strategy for 2-player game, drawing uniform variables and optionally redrawing
Mar
16
comment Group Permutations Proof
@CoolNewFriends: You can't use the statement you're trying to prove as part of its own proof.
Mar
10
reviewed Approve Calculating the mass of a surface?
Jan
16
reviewed Approve Limits of floor functions
Jan
8
reviewed Approve Solutions of $a^x = x$
Jan
8
comment How can I prove whether a $9\times 9$ square can be filled with L-shaped pieces in a completely “regular” way?
@coffeemath: Mmm...it's an L-shape that's three times as large. I count 9 L-pieces, thus 27 squares, which can and does form an L-shape where each "square" is composed of 9 smaller squares.
Jan
8
comment How can I prove whether a $9\times 9$ square can be filled with L-shaped pieces in a completely “regular” way?
+1 for a simpler way to state my thought process and thus simplify the (false) proof.