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Assistant Professor of Mathematics


15h
revised Prove where $|x|^2(\sin(\pi|x|))^2$ (piecewise) is differentiable in $\mathbb{R}^2$
LaTeX formatting.
2d
revised What is the derivative of, $x e^{\ln(x^2)}$
LaTeX formatting.
2d
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Question about variable and constant notation in some properties
2d
reviewed Reject suggested edit on The implicit function theorem
2d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Cos x bounded by $x$-axis. Find k given information about k.
Apr
11
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Algebraic Combinatorics
Apr
11
comment An Algebraic Version of vector spaces
That is correct.
Apr
11
comment An Algebraic Version of vector spaces
And your example is a $\mathbb{Z}$-module, a.k.a. an abelian group. In fact, it's finitely generated, which is the closest thing to finite-dimensional in the module world.
Apr
11
comment In SAGE, what function factors a polynomial whose coefficients are parameters?
Have you tried asking here? ask.sagemath.org/questions
Apr
11
comment Show that $H$ is a subgroup of a group $G$ if and only if H is a subset of $G$ and there is an inclusion homomorphism from $H$ to $ G$.
@pxc3110 OK. It should still be something more like "Let $H$ and $G$ be groups. Then $H$ is a subgroup of $G$ if and only if..." The issue is that unless you know $H$ is a group, statements like $i(a * b) = a * b$ don't make sense if $*$ is not defined in $H$.
Apr
11
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Is the length of the composition series of a free module identical to the number of its bases?
Apr
11
revised Is the length of the composition series of a free module identical to the number of its bases?
minor spelling corrections
Apr
11
comment Show that $H$ is a subgroup of a group $G$ if and only if H is a subset of $G$ and there is an inclusion homomorphism from $H$ to $ G$.
"Inclusion homomorphism" only makes sense if $H$ is already known to be a group. That should really be one of the hypotheses.
Apr
11
comment Mean Value Theorem Answers wrong??
If you set that equal to $0$ and solving for $x$, then you found a critical point. This, a priori, has nothing to do with MVT.
Apr
11
comment Mean Value Theorem Answers wrong??
That's not an equation.
Apr
11
comment Mean Value Theorem Answers wrong??
Solved for $x$ in what equation?
Apr
11
comment Mean Value Theorem Answers wrong??
How did you get $1/3$?
Apr
10
comment Ratio Test help
The OP's claim IS the ratio test. This is exactly the statement that the OP wants to prove.
Apr
10
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Quotient is a square
Apr
9
comment Converges of sin functions with fractions
Well $\sin(n)$ is bounded, and $\sum \frac{1}{n^{3/2}}$ is a $p$-series. Maybe you can use this info to compare these two series using a test?