215 reputation
126
bio website rtwilson.com
location England, United Kingdom
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Feb 18 at 12:55

I'm a PhD student at the Institute for Complex Systems Simulation at the University of Southampton, UK studying complexity in Remote Sensing.

As part of my work I am heavily involved in Remote Sensing and GIS technologies - particularly ENVI/IDL programming and ArcGIS scripting using Python.

My academic website shows some examples of my work, and links to some of the software I have written.


Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
awarded  Famous Question
Sep
14
accepted A simple explanation of eigenvectors and eigenvalues with 'big picture' ideas of why on earth they matter
Feb
19
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
6
awarded  Scholar
Jan
6
accepted Distance from point to line using $x \sin \theta - y \cos\theta$
Jan
5
comment Distance from point to line using $x \sin \theta - y \cos\theta$
I used GeoGebra - see geogebra.org/cms
Jan
5
comment Distance from point to line using $x \sin \theta - y \cos\theta$
Thanks for the other formulation. You're right, I do understand that more, but unfortunately I need to understand the other formulation too - as the paper I am basing some of my work on uses it, and I need to understand the consequences of them not having the $+ d$ on the end of their equation. I can see that the line $y =x $ can be represented as $x \sin \theta - y \cos \theta = 0$, but I can't see how the $+ d$ bit works. It doesn't seem to behave like the y-intercept - so how, for example, should I represent $y = x + 6$ in the $\sin$ and $\cos$ formulation?
Jan
4
awarded  Supporter
Jan
4
comment Distance from point to line using $x \sin \theta - y \cos\theta$
Thanks. Can you confirm what $d$ should be? Is it just the y-intercept? I have tried plotting the $x \sin \theta - y \cos \theta + d = 0$ for various values of $d$, and it seems to change the angle of the line, as well as the y-intercept of the line (and $d$ doesn't seem to be the y-intercept). Any ideas?
Jan
3
asked Distance from point to line using $x \sin \theta - y \cos\theta$
Aug
31
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
3
awarded  Nice Question
May
3
awarded  Student
May
3
awarded  Autobiographer
May
3
asked A simple explanation of eigenvectors and eigenvalues with 'big picture' ideas of why on earth they matter