38,501 reputation
13672
bio website zakuski.utsa.edu/~jagy
location Berkeley, CA
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 4 mins ago

I put an email address here and intended it to be visible. In case it is not, search with my last name at http://www.ams.org/cml/

See me at http://mathoverflow.net/users/3324/will-jagy

and http://zakuski.utsa.edu/~jagy/ and

http://zakuski.math.utsa.edu/~kap/forms.html and

http://arxiv.org/find/math/1/au:+Jagy_W/0/1/0/all/0/1

If people would include the source of a given problem as part of the process of posting a question, life would be a little easier.


35m
comment What is a French curve, as mentioned by Feynman?
There is no single definitive french curve. Various shapes have been found useful for drafting.
1h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
see also amazon.com/Managing-Dental-Practice-Genghis-Khan/dp/1846193966
1h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
@copper.hat, he was happy, had all those ponies, yak butter for his tea
1h
answered show that $\lim_{k\to\infty}\frac{ k!} { k^k}= 0$ using stirling's formula
2h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
@copper.hat, there you go, or perhaps a damsel with a dulcimer. poetryfoundation.org/poem/173247
2h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Person_from_Porlock
2h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
@copper.hat, not hemlock, $$\begin{array}{l}\text{For he on honey-dew hath fed,}\cr \text{And drunk the milk of Paradise.}\end{array}$$
5h
comment Amazing property of 1729, and related questions
Not as widely known, soon after this Ramanujan was interrupted by a man from Porlock, and completely lost his train of thought.
5h
comment Finding an $n$ such that $n^2 \equiv -1 \mod p$
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonelli%E2%80%93Shanks_algorithm
5h
comment Finding an $n$ such that $n^2 \equiv -1 \mod p$
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cipolla%27s_algorithm
9h
comment How can i find if a given number occurs in a custom Fibonacci sequence?
You should probably display your idea for efficiently finding whether a number occurs in the original Fibonacci sequence, and give some examples. The verbal description is not precise enough, I am unable to estimate how much you know.
9h
answered Solving a system of three equations: $d = s\cdot 3, c = s\cdot 1.5, c = 2\cdot d$.
9h
comment Solving a system of three equations: $d = s\cdot 3, c = s\cdot 1.5, c = 2\cdot d$.
I read too quickly. they are all zero.
1d
comment A point minimizing total great circle distance to a given set of points on a hemisphere
Can't recall the name; in the plane, if you are given three points in an acute triangle, the optimum fourth point is in the interior of the triangle, such that the segments to the three triangle vertices meet at $120^\circ$ Similar on hemisphere. Given more than three points, rapidly gets messy.
1d
comment Why didn't Fermat provide proofs of his theorems?
@AsafKaragila, attempted to upvote your other comment
1d
comment Why didn't Fermat provide proofs of his theorems?
Apparently Leonardo da Vinci rarely finished anything.
1d
comment Is $\{1,1,2,3,4,5,\cdots,i,\cdots \} $ the simple continued fraction algebraic or transcendental?
@XL_at_China, after searching online, seems an open problem. Repeat mentions for cube root of 2, people think unbounded but no proof. Also, bounded but not periodic gives something completely different; see The Markoff and Lagrange Spectra by Cusick and Flahive
1d
comment Is $\{1,1,2,3,4,5,\cdots,i,\cdots \} $ the simple continued fraction algebraic or transcendental?
@XL_at_China, appears we do not know, but there are many books on continued fractions en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oskar_Perron
1d
comment Is $\{1,1,2,3,4,5,\cdots,i,\cdots \} $ the simple continued fraction algebraic or transcendental?
Steven, as to the OP's earlier question today, are there any known real algebraic numbers with unbounded "elements," as Khinchin calls them? These would be the {1,1,2,3,4,5...} above
1d
comment What math have I missed as an Engineeering graduate?
The traditional four pieces were analysis, geometry/topology, algebra, logic/foundations. Your classes have all stayed in or near the analysis part, and you have not mentioned PDE or measure theory. I do not think this represents a current consensus on major areas, it was at one time.