43,052 reputation
14084
bio website zakuski.utsa.edu/~jagy
location Berkeley, CA
age 58
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 32 mins ago

I put an email address here and intended it to be visible. In case it is not, search with my last name at http://www.ams.org/cml/

See me at http://mathoverflow.net/users/3324/will-jagy

and http://zakuski.utsa.edu/~jagy/ and

http://zakuski.math.utsa.edu/~kap/forms.html and

http://arxiv.org/find/math/1/au:+Jagy_W/0/1/0/all/0/1

If people would include the source of a given problem as part of the process of posting a question, life would be a little easier.


3h
comment Nature of the series $\sum\limits_{n}(g_n/p_n)^\alpha$ with $(p_n)$ primes and $(g_n)$ prime gaps
I just meant (3.12) and (3.13), for $n \geq 6$ we get $n \log n < p_n < n (\log n + \log \log n).$ As far as relationship, the logarithm is the expected size of the gap, we can not expect to compare series uniformly, but perhaps something based on averages is worth exploring. I don't have much more, this was never my area. If I get something that works i will leave an answer.
6h
comment Nature of the series $\sum\limits_{n}(g_n/p_n)^\alpha$ with $(p_n)$ primes and $(g_n)$ prime gaps
right, simple estimates in Rosser and Schoenfeld (1962) for the substitute series give convergence for your $\alpha > 1.$ So, compare partial sums for the two series up to $p_n,$ could be possible to resolve this. projecteuclid.org/euclid.ijm/1255631807 not suggesting it's easy
6h
comment Nature of the series $\sum\limits_{n}(g_n/p_n)^\alpha$ with $(p_n)$ primes and $(g_n)$ prime gaps
what happens if you just replace $g_n$ by $\log p_n?$
8h
answered How can I find the Pythagorean hypotenuse which gives a maximum Pythagorean triangles?
8h
comment How to prove that $\omega (n) = O\Big{(} \frac{\log(n)}{\log(\log(n))}\Big{)}$ as $n \to \infty$?
You just need your upper bound for the primorials themselves. The number of distinct primes dividing some $n$ is no more than the number of primes dividing the largest primorial that is less than or equal to $n.$
1d
comment How do I find the characteristic polynomial and eigenvalues?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Companion_matrix
1d
comment How do I find the characteristic polynomial and eigenvalues?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Companion_matrix
1d
comment how could i know a spam journal in mathematics from receiving email after submitting maniscript?s
I wouldn't. Page charges were a traditional part of mathematics publishing; however, these were always paid by one's department. If, as i think, you are on your own, this is just not a reasonable way for this to happen. There is, by the way, no way of telling how legitimate a completely new journal might be.
1d
comment Question about coprime intergers a,b that satisfy sa+tb=n for positive s and t.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coin_problem
2d
comment A sequence of $n^2$ real numbers which contains no monotonic subsequence of more than $n$ terms
also try $n=1,$ then $n=2,$ then $n=3.$ Maybe you can find a pattern out of those.
2d
comment How to integrate $1/(u^2 + u^4)$ du?
How do you get the cats to stay in the water long enough to complete the ritual?
2d
comment $x-y-2z=0$ find a perpendicular vector
no, $e = (1,-1,-2)$ or any multiple, such as $(-1,1,2)$ or $(-1/ \sqrt 6, 1/ \sqrt 6, 2/ \sqrt 6)$
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
@JoãoPedro, one of the boundaries comes from $y=1.$ It says that in the full problem
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
On a more positive note, my favorite teacher in high school used to make up songs for us; the one that fits here is "Just attention to the details and you'll get more problems right." He used the tunes of existing songs. Also played trumpet sometimes.
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
Oh, well. Put another way: by not looking anything up and by being careless, you have taken a problem that is set up to be fairly easy in actuality, then produced a few impossible variations, then, according to your words, gotten angry.
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
Not quite. You need to be a good deal more careful about all aspects of this.
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
In calculus books in English, volumes of rotation (or "revolution" ) come under two slightly different techniques, the "disk method" and the "shell method." Look those up. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_integration and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_integration
2d
comment How to find a solution to the elliptic curve
There is an intersection. see picture at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mordell_curve and figure out, roughly, how the picture for $y^2 = x^3 + 1$ should be changed to get your picture; I get that it should both move a bit to the right and straighten out somewhat. Worth checking that carefully
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
Edited after you answered. It turns out the actual question was volume of a solid of revolution, nothing to do with the integral posted in the first line of the question
2d
comment Solve this indefinite integral, based on a volume problem
the integral you list has nothing to do with the volume calculation.