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There are, at least, two ''practical'' kinds of situations where using symbolic computation is useful: When exact values and calculations are required. If they are inaccurate, errors could amplify and lead to very bad results. See the following Java code, which represent numeric values and operations according with the IEEE 754 floating-point standard: ...


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Aplusix is a software to do this kind of things in the context of education.


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You might find interesting a computer app called Group Explorer. The app provides visualizations of 59 groups. All visualizations can be exported via clipboard. Here are some features of multiplication table visualizations: Coloration Subgroup organization Separation of cosets


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I would recommend LaTeX / TeX , it is used by every professional. Once you get used to it, typing mathematical symbols and equations are relatively fast, and no clicking is involved. For learning and seeing how it works, i would recommend the LaTeX Equation Editor: http://www.codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php


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As another example, the development of the GAP system for discrete computational algebra is now hosted on GitHub: https://github.com/gap-system/gap. The GAP Project welcomes contributions from everyone, in the form of code, documentation, blog posts, etc. For contributions to the GitHub repository, please read the guidelines. To keep up to date on GAP ...


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Also, try GAP, an open-source system for discrete computational algebra. To install in on Windows, I recommend to use the .exe installer downloadable from this link which always points to the latest official GAP release. Documentation on GAP is included in the distribution and is also available online. In particular, see the GAP Tutorial and GAP ...


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Try using Smart Math Calculator. Here is a sample of your newton recursive formula in this program:


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Take a look at this project http://www.formulae.org It is open source, it is about math and it is partially documented. There are several sources for documentation: the developer's guide (LaTeX, partially), the front-end user´s guide (LaTeX, starting), the API reference (JavaDoc, partially) and expression dictionary (online wiki, partially)


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Take a look at the Fōrmulæ project: http://www.formulae.org . If the edition of such these expressions is not currently supported, you can create it, because it is a collaborative, open source project. Expressions can be edited on the fly, internally they are trees, and you can use cut/copy/paste subtrees, just as you want. You can also write code for the ...


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That is excellent free (both as in free speech and as in free beer) software available that you can use for that purpose. I suggest Maxima or GNU Octave.


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Great question! I would like to suggest you to have a look to some Python libraries specialized on Mathematics, like sympy or gmpy. I use them often to study and make my tests, and I miss always some extra explanations or samples in the online documentation. They are really great, and some extra samples and theory-related explanations would be imho a good ...


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Take a look here. I believe that is it.


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I won't say it is (or isn't) the best choice, but I will say it's possible, though maybe a bit challenging, with Sage: This image is from this link. I can confirm that Sage plays nicely with OS X (better than with Windows, I believe), although I've never tried to animate anything; it may have quite a learning curve. You can download and run everything on ...



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