New answers tagged

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J is very useful. While it has its quirks, once you get used to them, as gar said, you can really understand the language quite well. I consider myself a novice at J, but being exposed to it, I can definitely tell what the example in the accepted answer's "mysterious code". It's easy enough to say you don't know what a program does, that's the same for many ...


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Euklides produces pretty nice geometry sketch.


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I don't think interactive geometry software as referred can achieve what you are looking for. Given your link example, what you are looking for is Instrumenpoche. The tools is specifically developed by French mathematics teachers to demonstrate compas and ruler constructions. It is free software but I am afraid you will need some basic French to navigate ...


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Sketchometry comes with a minimal interface with gesture controls to construct straight line and circle.


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I can describe how I will do it with Dr. Geo, a free interactive geometry software I am developing. From the menu Edit>Customise interface, you select the tools you want: select and move, point, circle, segment and macro tools, Select only the tools you want Then you save your empty sketch under the name Minimimal for example, Next time you load the ...


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Desmos Graphing Calculator, is, yes a graphing calculator, but it is also really useful for geometric drawing. On their homepage they illustrate several examples of how versatile the tool is for drawing. The main drawback of the program is that you need to know the algebraic (Cartesian, Parametric, or Polar) equations behind your shape to draw it. On the ...


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You can take a look at GNU Dr. Geo a free software of mine, there is no commercial limitation and you can even redistribute it along your work. You can do classic interactive geometry with: Or you can use its programming features to design very original sketches: More over, it is very easy to modify Dr. Geo from itself, in case of need!


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If you are referring to geometric sketch, I like to use Dr. Geo, a free software of mine. It is an interactive geometry and programming software. You can make very easily construction with the mouse or more complex iterative one with its programming API. Interactive geometric sketch designed with mouse and clic


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You can take a look at Dr. Geo. It is an interactive geometry software I wrote with a programming API. You can design your sketch then ask for the equations. You can do it with code (as in the screenshot) or with mouse and clic. Extrapolating from your example, to get the equation of a tangente to a circle, you describe a sketch as bellow: | sketch circle ...


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SAGE can also do this. It also has a cloud version, so you don't have to install anything. Here's how I would do your example in SAGE: G = SymmetricGroup(4) G L = G.list() g = L[5] g h = L[10] h g*h Symmetric group of order 4! as a permutation group (2,3,4) (1,2,4,3) (1,2) To explain what is going on: In the first line I create the symmetric group of ...


4

Try GAP: http://www.gap-system.org . It is designed to work with groups, and specially permutations. Here is a sample: gap> (1,2,3,4)*(1,4,3,2); () gap> G:=DihedralGroup(IsPermGroup,8); Group([ (1,2,3,4), (2,4) ]) gap> cc:=ConjugacyClasses(G); [ ()^G, (2,4)^G, (1,2)(3,4)^G, (1,2,3,4)^G, (1,3)(2,4)^G ] gap> for c in cc do > ...


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S = QQ[x,y,z,t] M = module S/ideal "xy2,x2z" for i from 0 to 4 list Ext^i (M,S) In general, if you have installed M2 property, viewHelp would direct you to a help page, and help would give you a short help message in M2.


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All there seems to be currently is an answer for his set inclusion symbol. See How to reproduce the "old" Peano's symbol for set inclusion


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The original equation in this thread now plots correctly as well as several others that previously would not plot such as $\ \sin (x+y) = x/y \ $. Even simple ones like $ \ \sin y = x \ $ would not plot a year ago and now work with no problem. Nice work GeoGebra.


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[Too long for a comment] Here’s what Mathematica finds, with the function period scaled to $2\pi$. f[t_]=Piecewise[{ {1+E^(-(3/(2\[Pi]))Mod[t,2\[Pi]]),0<=Mod[t,2\[Pi]]<2/3 \[Pi]}, {2,2/3 \[Pi]<=Mod[t,2\[Pi]]<2\[Pi]} }] s[t_]=FourierSeries[f[t],t,10] Plot[{f[t],s[t]},{t,0,2\[Pi]}] $2-\frac{1}{3 e}-\frac{i (-1+e) e^{3 i t-1}}{3 (-i+2 \pi ...


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I think I got it! Thanks @Michael. def placeSineWaveFunc(self, freq, amp, phase, cycles, pointsPerCycle): polyline = self.polyline numPoints = int(cycles * pointsPerCycle + 0.5) + 1 for n in range(0, numPoints): t = n / pointsPerCycle polyline.addPoint(QPointF(t, amp * math.sin(2*math.pi*freq*t + phase))) \o/


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GAP (http://www.gap-system.org), which is, as it is written on the GAP website, an open source "system for computational discrete algebra, with particular emphasis on Computational Group Theory. GAP provides a programming language, a library of thousands of functions implementing algebraic algorithms written in the GAP language as well as large data ...


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It seems to me that there is a typo in the formulation of the question because the paper "The Complex Leech Lattice and Maximal Subgroups of the Suzuki Group" by R.Wilson gives $(0123456789X)$, $(13954)(267X8)$ and $(\infty 0)(18)(7364)(29X5)$ as generators for $M_{11}$ on page 153 (note also that $X$ and $8$ are in the reverse order in the question). ...


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Try 3D Calc Plotter You'll need a browser that can load legacy Javascript, like say Internet Explorer 10. The link will not work in Chrome or the new Microsoft Edge browser. But it is very full featured. You can save the graphs to print in a 3d printer and a host of other options.


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I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for, but consider the range of numbers 100-199. There are 100 numbers, but, since each number has a digit in the tens column, and a digit in the ones column, there are actually 200 positions that a zero can occupy. Therefore, there a $200 / 10 = 20$ zeroes in this range of numbers. For the range 1000-1999, there ...



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