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These all have english subtitles and are are highly enjoyable: Discrete Mathematics. Arsdigita University. Instructor: Shai Simonson The Fourier Transforms and its Applications. Standford. Professor Brad Osgood Probability. Harvard Probability Primer. Mathematicalmonk's channel General topology from the very basics, including set theory, techniques for ...


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There is a youtuber who also works at Khan Academy as far as I am aware. He created his own animation program specifically designed for mathematics animation and I believe anyone is free to use it. I think it looks very good. He goes by the username 3Blue1Brown on youtube.


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One option is also GNU Dr. Geo, a libre interactive geometry and programming software I wrote, you can use it on Mac OS X Regarding plotting capabilities, it is best used with its programming interface to produce very interesting and appealing interactive diagram. For example, related to single variable function, root finding algorithms can be compared. ...


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If you have acces to a Unix machine, then you probably have bc installed: % bc a=9069623170135106601720652920891221901050326166164088662904293991480616103992855701624463727487162247889904330833818932916941082247238731419301804839603756 b=26844628193432396109627227465177021833123967807981281489587894114558469448102682070257837402824170487 a/b a%b gives you ...


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Desmos is an excellent graphing calculator, it's very easy and intuitive to use. It also implements derivatives and, since the last update, integrals too.


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I hope, this might work. DGALib := "E:/Maple work/General Maple Workout/DGApplications.mla/"; libname := DGALib, libname:


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@Théophile and @Jean-Sébastien have correctly pointed out the syntax issues with your code. Maple 18 is facing no difficulty to evaluate this integral directly. You just need to use evalf to get the answer. int((exp(-(0.25*(y-2.)^2)/y)*((0.0805163*y+0.161033)*erf(0.942809+0.288675*sqrt(y)-0.57735/sqrt(y))+0.0805163* y+0.161033))/y^(3/2),y=0..infinity); ...


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Another user suggested the 'op' command. That will work provided that your polynomial has two or more terms, but if the polynomial input is itself a monomial, op will return the factors of the monomial term, which you don't want. You could get around that with MonomialList := e->`if`(type(e,`+`), convert(e,list), [e]); Examples: > ...


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In which directory have you put DGApplications.mla, aside from your Downloads folder? Since you say you keep your Maple stuff on that directory on E:, I'm going to assume you put it there. Then at the top of the worksheet in which you wish to make use of the DGApplications library, add the line: libname := libname, "E:\\Maple work\\General Maple ...


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Why not a database with LibreOffice? Or something more LaTeX oriented as TeXmacs: it comes with fantastic LaTeX quality rendering, it can link documents (not sure how far though) and embed mathematics output from third party software.


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An abelian group is not a good example, because subgroups are the same as conjuagcy classes of subgroups. Here is some code for a group of order $243$ that you might find helpful. > G:=SmallGroup(243,50); > A:=Agemo(G,1); > L:=[s`subgroup: s in Subgroups(G:OrderEqual:=3)]; > LL:= &cat[[ l^t : t in RightTransversal(G,Normalizer(G,l))] : ...


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The symbol $\sum$ denotes the greek letter sigma (or "s") in caps, and the integral symbol $\int$ comes from a long "s", for the Latin summa (sum, or total). Both thus represent "sums" of elements. The first one is generally reserved for a finite number of elements, or an infinite one, but discrete enough (imagine you could sum the integers $1$, $2$, $3$, ...


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$\displaystyle x = 1/n\sum\limits_{i=1}^n xi $ means $\displaystyle x = \frac1n \left( x_1 + x_2 + x_3 + \ldots + x_{n-1} + x_n \right)$. We see here that the variable $i$ takes on all the integer values from $1$ to $n$ since those are the lower and upper limits on the sum. Let's say if $n = 3$ then $\displaystyle x = 1/3\sum\limits_{i=1}^3 xi = \frac13 ...


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$\sum_{i=1}^nx_i$ is simply $x_1+x_2+x_3+\ldots+x_n$, the sum of the $n$ numbers $x_1,\ldots,x_n$. Now you’re multiplying that by $\frac1n$, or, equivalently, dividing it by $n$, so you’re just taking the average (arithmetic mean): $$\frac1n\sum_{i=1}^nx_i=\frac{x_1+x_2+\ldots+x_n}n\;.$$ If, say, $n=4$, $x_1=3,x_2=5,x_3=1$, and $x_4=5$, then ...


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The p-value is somewhere in $[0,0.10)$. It is not necessarily less than $0.05$


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What about TeXmacs? TeXmacs is a kind of mathematics processing application: it does word processing for mathematics with LaTeX quality and it can be interfaced with specialized mathematics tools for graphing, numeric and algebraic calculus. So you can write down mathematical notes (buffer) with source from own writing and third party computation or ...


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You may consider TeXmacs, it is a free wysiwyw editing platform with special features for scientists. More related to your question, you can interface it with a lot of third party mathematics tools for algebraic calculus, graphing, numeric calculus, etc. Developed on GNU/Linux, it runs under Windows and Mac OS X as well. I guess the best user ...



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