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Are you looking for 2D graphs or 3D? For 3D you can download "Graphing Calculator 3D" to plot beautiful 3D graphs. It uses the rendering capabilities of your video card to generate impressive graphs. http://www.runiter.com/graphing-calculator/ Here are some screen shots:


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If you're using a Mac, try Grapher, which comes with the system. If you can use an online program, make sure to try Desmos.


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xmgrace is pretty good though I prefer gnuplot.


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If you're looking for something programmatic you could give gnuplot a go, there are also a bunch of libraries so you can use it via different programming languages. If you're writing a document with LaTex (or some other tex variant) you could also use tikz I believe.


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The number is so large it cannot be reasonably represented. I ignored the $+1, -1$ and took the log in Alpha. The result is a little over $10^{10^8}$, so in decimal would have more than that many digits. Note that $3+\sqrt 2 \gt 2$ and dividing the two terms involving it leaves (ignoring the $+1$ in the numerator) $3^{2^{333111365}}$ which completely ...


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$$\frac{(2+\sqrt3)^{2^{333111366}}+1}{(2^{333111367}-1)(2+\sqrt{3})^{2^{333111365}}}$$If this is Your Number, The Wolfram Alpha says It's $$10^{10^{10^{8.001199221375904}}}$$ and it also says that It's not a positive integer


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One of the oldest ISC (Inverse Symbolic Computer) is the Plouffe's inverter, cited here for memory because it is no longer available at http://pi.lacim.uqam.ca/ Others were already quoted in the peceeding answers : http://oldweb.cecm.sfu.ca/ http://oldweb.cecm.sfu.ca/projects/ISC/ISCmain.html Also, WolframAlpha provides such tool : ...


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Here are a few books as stated in this answer: The first two books reference each other, so I recommend having both on hand. The third is in my reading queue. All are by Jonathan Borwein and David Bailey. Experimentation in Mathematics Mathematics by Experiment Experimental Mathematics in Action These books cover Mathematica, Maple, and many other tools. ...


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Let's your two problems separately. Doing back of the envelope calculations in software to prevent math errors. While I often use computer algebra systems (Mathematica, Maxima, Sage, Wolfram Alpha) to work out thorny integrals and complicated derivatives, I've never seen one that will assist with line-by-line derivations involving a lot of symbolic ...


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Is there a function in Mathematica or any other software that allows you to find closed forms for decimal numbers calculated with high precision? Maple has the identify command. The Inverse Symbolic Calculator is based on Maple. In Mathematica, there are Rationalize and Recognize, the latter of which requires the installation and appellation of the ...


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Need 30 characters.................. http://isc.carma.newcastle.edu.au/standard


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First, I think that your question is a little confused - in part, because of the notation. I believe that you're looking for the two-cycles under iteration of the function $$f(x) = x e^{r(1-x)}.$$ Put another way, you're looking for the solutions to the equation $f(f(x)) = x$ that are not already solutions of $f(x)=x$. I'm also guessing that you'd like ...


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Here's how I'd plot your image in Mathematica. B[a_, b_][z_] := z(z - a)/(1-Conjugate[a]z)(z-b)/(1-Conjugate[b] z); compPts[a_, b_][lambda_] := Quiet[Solve[B[a, b][z] == lambda, z], Solve::ratnz]; realPts[a_, b_][ lambda_] := {Re[#], Im[#]} & /@ (z /. compPts[a, b][lambda]); pic[a_, b_] := Graphics[{ {Thick, Circle[]}, {PointSize[Large], ...


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I like this, which seems to go by just the name 'Knot'. Although the input is essentially the same as for SnapPy (drawing the link), I've personally found it much easier to use.


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This can be done in a single call to implicitplot3d. plots:-implicitplot3d(x*y*z=1, x=-1..1, y=-1..1, z=-200..200, grid=[40,40,40], style=surface); And the particular look & feel can be adjusted as desired, via options. Eg., plots:-implicitplot3d(x*y*z=1, x=-1..1, y=-1..1, z=-200..200, grid=[40,40,40], ...


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Do you have to use Maple? If not then you can use Graphing Calculator 3D instead. You can type implicit equation x * y * z = -1 and get the result below.


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You may use GAP for this. After installing GAP, download two files, sysnum.gd and sysnum.gi. Then you can work as follows: gap> Read("/path/to/file/sysnum.gd"); gap> Read("/path/to/file/sysnum.gi"); gap> R := SystematicNumbersRing( 2 ); Integers base 2 gap> a := SystematicNumber( R, 2 ); 10 gap> b := SystematicNumber( R, 3 ); 11 ...


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If you are looking for a software that is both easy to use (no scripting required) and generates high quality 3d implicit graphs then use Graphing Calculator 3D: http://www.runiter.com/blogs/math/plot-implicit-functions-3d.html To plot implicit graph of sphere you can simply type x^2+y^2+z^2=1 in the program after selecting Implicit mode.


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What about Maxima from MIT? It's under GNU-license.


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My belief is that the language is not meant to write code for others to understand, rather we can save a lot of keystrokes once we get used to the language. I mainly use J for simulating problems on probability, and also for the fun of functional programming! ( I try to maintain a list of the stackexchange problems simulations on my github profile )


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This can be done in Maple by the short code with(GraphTheory): M := Matrix(17, 17, (i, j) -> if is(i+j, prime) and i+j <> 2 then i+j else 0 end if): G := Graph(M); KruskalsAlgorithm(G, w, animate); See one of the frames: The loop at vertex $1$ ($1+1=2$) should be excluded from $G$. See that animation in action here.


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Tikz is a popular drawing tool for $\LaTeX$. It is fairly dificult to get going, but the manual is very valuable, and there is also a tex SE site. With a lot of valuable information. What you can do with it is endless, but it will take time. Note that it is also possible to make simple figures/diagrams in programs such as maple, mathematica and the like and ...



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