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1

I think what you want is too ambitious and results from a somewhat naive view of mathematical formulae as self-contained structures. In fact almost all mathematical formulae have a lot of implicit dependence on each other, on context and on conventions. If one were to make all those dependencies explicit, the resulting structure would be quite complicated ...


2

It should read (1/(2*A8)) For the second term Your current second term reads (1/2 *A8) which means $\frac{1}{ 2} A8$


1

Try GeoGebra.${}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}$


0

Gnuplot is freely available and happens to have a degree feature. The simple plots guide shows trig functions.


3

At this site one can get following: Input: int(int(int(psi^2, x = -inf .. inf), y = -inf .. inf), z = -inf .. inf) = 1 Output: oo oo oo / / / | | | 2 | | | psi dx dy dz = 1 | | | / / / -oo -oo -oo Input: sqrt(e) = 1+1/(1+1/(1+1/(1+1/(5+1/(1+1/(1+1/(9+1/(1+1/(1+...))))))))) ...


0

Geogebra would best suit your purpose.


1

You can try eulerAPE. It is available online via this link.


1

Asymptote is (imho) one of the best open-source 3d graphic tools designed specifically for this task. It is part of the TeXLive distribution, and deeply interacts with LaTeX to render the labels. This image was constructed (programmed) in terms of 3d lines, curves and surfaces with the following code: // // sph.asy // size(6cm); import ...


1

You can use the packages pgfplots or TikZ in Latex. They are very powerful. You can see some examples here .


-1

I would recommend SyMAT for starting out with. Scripts are written in your choice of Python and JavaScript. (Full disclosure: I am the lead developer of SyMAT.)


0

I think that I understand that you're doing this in 2D. So I'll tell you how to think about the problem of finding a parametric curve $g(t) = (at^2 + bt + c, dt^2 + et + f)$ that satisfies four conditions: \begin{align} g(0) &= A \\ g(1) &= B \\ g'(0) &= v \\ g'(1) &= w \end{align} The short answer: for arbitrary $A, B, v, w$, this has no ...


-1

Perhaps I would advise to use SCaVis math program. It is easy to make plots, draw functions etc. in this program. In addition, it can teach kids a programming language (Python) at the same time, which is an industry standard.


-1

SCaVis is a free math program written in Java and runs on Mac/Windows/Linux. It has hundreds of example that makes it perfect for education.


-1

SCaVis (http://jwork.org/scavis/) is free program for symbolic computation.


0

Also, try SCaVis program for scientific computations. It is 100% Java, runs on windows and free. jPort also runs on Windows (Java) and can install about 10 free math programs that run on Windows.


0

SCaVis mathematical visualization program is a good start for drawing 3D surface plots, functions and data points. It is a free program licensed under the GNU public license.


-1

Look at the SCaVis program. It is free. You can draw 3D functions, parametric functions in 3D. The canvas is called HPlot3D. Look at the at the example galley with math plots.


0

Only dragging up an old post because there's still something more to do -- if you want a penrose tiling as a background, I built one a while ago that will generate an image for your purpose: https://github.com/etisab/penrosetiler Of course the tiles don't fit perfectly into a rectangle (they are clipped at the edges), it should work just fine as a pretty ...



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