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I don't know if that's what you're looking for, but here are some equivalent ways to visualize spheres. I added some sketches, I hope they help somewhat. One standard way to think of an n-dimensional sphere is by taking an n-dimensional ball and identifying all the points of its boundray. For example, for $S^2$, we have a $2$-dimensional disk, which has ...


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First, note that a homeomorphism $f$ of compact smooth manifolds is homotopic to a diffeomorphism if and only if one can approximate $f$ arbitrarily well by diffeomorphisms. For $n \leq 3$, this paper of Munkres claims as a corollary that a homeomorphism $f: M \to N$ of smooth manifolds may be approximated arbitrarily well by a diffeomorphism. This settles ...


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In dimensions 2 and 3 every homeomorphism is isotopic to a diffeomorphism (this should be in Moise's book "Geometric topology in dimensions 2 and 3", it also follows from Kirby and Siebenmann's work). In dimension 4 there are self-homeomorphisms of simply-connected smooth compact manifolds which are not homotopic to diffeomorphisms. This follows e.g. from ...


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Do you mean: The transition maps as maps between subsets of $\mathbb{R}^n$ are isometries with respect to the standard Euclidean metric on $\mathbb{R}^n$? Then the answer is manifolds admitting a flat metric. If the metric is complete, the manifold has universal cover $\mathbb{R}^n$ with the Euclidean metric and the manifold is $\mathbb{R}^n$ modulo some ...



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