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0

If I were you I would try to show them what is going on geometrically (try using Geogebra of some other software) and I would tell them how it applies to life. Finally, try teaching them something that's a little above them just to get their thoughts going: calculus, multivariable calculus, topology, manifolds etc...


1

As Alexander Gruber has pointed out, just plain reading a book can be boring. When I read a book, I generally have my white board (portable size) and work through the examples or problems so I am not just reading the book I am interacting with it. You will find in many upper level math books, as you read them or in your case if you read them, that the ...


6

Reading math books to learn math does, at least at times, feel a bit like reading a dictionary to learn a language. Linguists and polyglots will affirm that this is a bad strategy. Instead, they will recommend that you go find some people who speak the language you want, and just start talking to them! If you run into something you don't know how to say, ...


6

Principles is an excellent text, but I don't think it's well-suited to self-study. There's nothing wrong with it, honestly, and you'd probably be fine reading it, but to me it's one of those many excellent texts that doesn't really "stick" to the reader that well. It's a better text for an intensive undergrad course with a good professor. There's a ...


7

Rudin's Principles of Mathematical Analysis is an extraordinarily onerous book. Even the parts that are not hard require a lot of work. Also, it does not cover complex analysis at all. Even in the parts where it deals with complex numbers. For example if you study the complex-valued function $x\mapsto e^{inx}$, where $x$ is a real variable, you're doing ...


1

Topology is full of fun math problems/puzzles and kids have good spatial abilities from an early age. Here are some sources I found on first search, I bet you find more: http://www.educationfund.org/uploads/docs/Publications/Curriculum_Ideas_Packets/Twists%20and%20Turns.pdf ...


1

They could investigate compound interest. Some questions they could answer: How long would it take to save up enough money to buy an Xbox One if you deposited $\$10$ a week in a bank account at $1\%$? How long would it take to become a millionaire? How about with $\$50$/week? How about at $3\%$? If they want to have $\$5$ million by the time they're 65, ...


1

One idea for a project would be to analyze the game 'hog'. In this game, a player's turn consists of choosing (in advance) the number of dice to be rolled. This number of dice are rolled. If any die comes up 1, the player scores 0 points for the turn; but if none of the dice show a 1, then the player scores the sum of the rolls. This game lends itself to ...


2

Can they graph functions? Do they understand polynomials? Can they plot a line of the form $y=mx+b$? A powerful exercise is to give them a series of lines to plot, e.g. $$y = m_1x + b_1 \\ y = m_2x+b_2\\ \vdots$$ You can pre-compute $m_i$ and $b_i$ so that they are tangent curves to a polynomial. A quadratic would be ideal. Have them plot these curves on ...


1

A very complete book I recommend is Calculus from Ron Larson. The explanations are very clear and intuitive. However, it is not very concise.


4

You could try self study with some classic texts. (Personally, I'd start with Spivak's Calculus.) But inevitably, you will want someone to answer your questions and there's nothing like the cold shower of having your first hundred or thousand proofs/solutions read by a very critical eye. So you might also consider hiring a tutor to do those two things.


0

You're only 19, so yes you can definitely learn math at your age. Find out what strands of math are giving you trouble and go back to the basics for that particular strand of math. Doing lots and lots of exercises is a sure way to learn/reinforce a concept.


7

My answer to number 1 is a resounding YES! Of course, you can always learn math. However, you won't like my other advice: don't leave college. Your desire to leave it is a remnant of the same laziness that caused you to learn mathematics badly in elementary school. In college, a lot of mathematics starts over. You don't really need a lot of mathematical ...


1

I second using something like khanacademny.com to get a refresher on Math. Their World of Math track starts at the beginning. I started doing it because I'm preparing to go back to graduate school after a few years out of undergrad. I took up to Calculus (I and II) in college, but now that I've been out of school for a few years some of the specifics have ...


2

I've found that if the exercises in the book you are working on seem too difficult and lack context, the likely problem is that the book is above your level. The solution to this seems to be to drop down a notch. For example at the moment I need to learn measure theory, so I tried reading "Real and Complex Analysis" by Rudin (I found a basically brand-new ...


2

Calculus is all about practise. If you have a book you're studying from, make summaries and do as many exercises as you can. You cannot read a Calculus book like a novel, but need to understand every concept before passing on to the next one, because it all builds up. Good luck



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