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Let $(X, d_X)$ and $(Y, d_Y)$ be metric spaces. A map $f : X \to Y$ is said to be continuous at $x_0$ if for every $\varepsilon > 0$, there is $\delta > 0$ such that $d_Y(f(x_0), f(x)) < \delta$ whenever $d_X(x_0, x) < \varepsilon$. A map $f : X \to Y$ is said to be continuous if it is continuous at $x_0$ for all $x_0 \in X$.

Let $(X, \tau_X)$ and $(Y, \tau_Y)$ be topological spaces. A map $f : X \to Y$ is said to be continuous if for every $U \in \tau_Y$, $f^{-1}(U) \in \tau_X$.

In the case of a metric spaces, the metric induces a topology, and the two notions of continuity coincide.

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