The study of algebraic structures and properties applying to large classes of such structures. For example, ideas from group theory and ring theory are extended and considered for structures with other signatures (systems of basic or fundamental operations).

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109 views

Is there some kind of deep relationship between substitution and recursion?

Define $\mathbb{N}$ as the initial object in the following category: Objects. Sets $X$ equipped with a function $S : X \rightarrow X$ and an element $0:X$. Morphisms. Functions that preserves ...
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1answer
26 views

Cokernel in universal algebra

Let $(S,f_1,\ldots,f_n)$ be an algebra of some variety and $(T,g_1,\ldots,g_n)$ be another algebra of the same variety. Next let $\varphi:S\to T$ be a homomorphism. I understand well that ...
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46 views

Slick Definition of the Category of Cartesian Closed Categories

I can produce elementary definitions by just inspecting the definition on nlab, but is there a readily available abstract definition? I vaguely remember seeing that they could be defined as algebras ...
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2answers
148 views

A categorical first isomorphism theorem

It is known, that for a morphism of universal algebras $f : A \to B$, if $R$ is the congruence relation given by $xRy \Leftrightarrow fx=fy$, then $\operatorname{im} f \cong A/R $. Here is an idea ...
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1answer
52 views

If finitely many algebraic identities do not imply some identity, is there always a finite counterexample?

This question just popped up while experimenting with Prover9 and Mace4. Say we have a finite signature and some finite set of identities $E_i$ in the sense of universal algebra, like the axioms for ...
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1answer
64 views

Why is the collections of all groups a variety

A variety is an equationally defined class of algebras. As I understand it equationally defined means defined by universally quantified equations, for example the variety of all semigroups could be ...
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0answers
92 views

Medium-strong (graph) homomorphisms

Weak (graph) homomorphisms are mappings $f: V(G) \rightarrow V(G')$ such that the images of connected nodes $x,y$ (in the source graph) are connected: $$R(x,y) \rightarrow R(f(x),f(y)) = R(x',y')$$ ...
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1answer
46 views

Does equivalence of algebraic categories imply bi-interpratibility of their theories?

By an algebraic theory $\mathcal{T}$ I mean any category with finite products such that the objects are given by all finite powers of some object $X$. Let $Alg\mathcal{T}$ be the concrete category of ...
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45 views

Kernel cokernel correspondence?

On page 367 of Categorical Foundations: Special Topics in Order, Topology, Algebra, and Sheaf Theory there is mentioned a kernel co-kernel correpsondence, which says there's an equivalence between ...
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3answers
50 views

Question about universal quantifier

when I was reading a paper about the universal quantifier, I met this equation, says we can do conversions like the following: A -> B ≡ ¬A v B can anyone help ...
3
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1answer
39 views

Sufficient conditions for the category of group objects to have coproducts

For a category $\mathbf{C}$ with finite products, denote by $\mathbf{C}_{\text{Grp}}$ the category of group objects in $\mathbf{C}$. Using the fact that $G\in \operatorname{Obj}(\mathbf{C})$ is a ...
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3answers
118 views

What is the importance of “variety of algebras” in Universal Algebra?

Given an algebraic category, Birkhoff's Variety Theorem gives a categorical characterization of the full subcategories whose object-class forms a variety (i.e. can be defined by equations in the sense ...
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27 views

Non-roots of unity auxillary constants in a group?

Let $A$ be a set, together with a set $F$ of n-ary operations on A, which may include constants of $A$ as 0-ary operations. A set $G$ of operations on $A$ is said to be auxillary with respect to the ...
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1answer
32 views

finite presentations of algebraic structures

I've read an algebraic variety $A$ is finitely presented if there's a coequalizer diagram $$F(m)\rightrightarrows F(n)\twoheadrightarrow A$$ where $F(n)$ is the free model on $n$ generators. I'm ...
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2answers
52 views

How, intuitively, does commuting with filtered colimits capture “smallness”?

Definition. A compact object is an object representing a copresheaf which commutes with filtered colimits. In algebraic categories, the compact objects are the finitely presented ones, so commuting ...
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3answers
47 views

Constants in a signature

This is my first post so I hope it works! Taking the axioms for a group as an example, the literature defines a group in (at least) two different ways: Method 1 A signature of $(G,\circ,\,^{-1})$ ...
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2answers
152 views

Reference for understanding coalgebra

I am trying to read this paper, but I have no knowledge of coalgebra and have just started to learn Category Theory so I am struggling to understand it. Are there any references that can explain ...
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1answer
29 views

Finite algebraic structure where there is no finite generating set of equations

Let $A$ be an algebra whose carrier set is finite. Must it be the case that there is a finite set of equations which generate all the universally valid equations in that structure? If not, can anyone ...
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23 views

what can we say if we just know the global section has a given universal algebra structure?

Given an universal algebra A, how to reconstruct a topological space X with some universal (and natural) property (e.g initial,terminal...)in the category of topological spaces whose global sections ...
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109 views

Most general form of Cayley's theorem?

For many classes of algebraic structures, there exists a family of structures such that any member of the class can be embedded in some member of the family (groups and symmetric groups, unital rings ...
3
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1answer
74 views

Equational identities of real multiplication augmented by a real number

Consider the structure $(\mathbb R, *, r)$, where $r$ is a real number that is neither $0$, $1$, or $-1$. Are the commutative and associative identities already sufficient to derive all the ...
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0answers
26 views

It has at most one absorbing element

Let $G = (M, \circ )$ be a groupoid and let $2^G = (2^M, \circ_K)$ a groupoid ( $\circ_K$ is the Product of group subsets). How can show that $G$ has at most one absorbing element?
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1answer
62 views

Is groups with binary operation alone a variety?

In the signature (+, 0, -), the class of groups are a variety, because they can be defined by a set of universal equations. But is it already a variety in the signature (+), by itself? The more ...
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1answer
38 views

Understanding Quotienting by Relations vs Quotienting by Generators

I understand the idea of a quotient algebra $A / I$ where $A$ is a $K$-algebra and $I$ is a two-sided ideal, i.e. I understand the projection map as an algebra morphism. However, I'm unsure about how ...
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1answer
44 views

No simplifying identities for any single nonzero number under addition.

Consider the structure $(\mathbb{R}, +, r)$, where r is a nonzero real number. Are the commutative and associative identities already sufficient to derive all universally valid equations in that ...
3
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1answer
121 views

Uppercase E notation for sets?

In Jónsson and Tarski's (1951) paper Boolean Algebras with Operators, Part I from the American Journal of Mathematics, they write formulae such as $L_i = \underset{u}{\mathbf{E}} \, [u \in At^m ...
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1answer
171 views

$\mathbf{N}_5$ as a congruence lattice

A finite lattice is said to be representable if there exists a finite algebra whose congruence lattice is isomorphic to that lattice. As I was reading a paper, I came across the line: "The reader can ...
3
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1answer
217 views

$M_3$ is a simple lattice

I'd like to prove (exercise 9.5 in Roman's Lattices and Ordered Sets, p.203) that the lattice $M_3$ is simple, meaning that the only congruences on $M_3$ are the trivial ones (the 'equality' ...
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1answer
60 views

Finding the congruences of a lattice

Part of the excercise I am currently doing is finding the congruences of the following lattice: The problem I struggle with the most is what happends when $1 \sim d$ - how to find what is the ...
6
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1answer
378 views

Lattices are congruence-distributive

$\newcommand{\r}[1]{\mathrel{#1}}$ First, a few definitions. Given a lattice $L$, a congruence on $L$ is an equivalence relation $\theta$, compatible with the lattice operations, i.e. if ...
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75 views

cofree coalgebra: explicit description from its universal property

Let $k$ be a commutative ring. There is a forgetful functor $$U : \mathsf{Coalg}_k \to \mathsf{Mod}_k$$ from $k$-coalgebras to $k$-modules. This has a right adjoint $R : \mathsf{Mod}_k \to ...
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1answer
64 views

Algebraic lattices and distributivity over joins of upward directed sets

I am reading Burris & Sankappanavar, Chapter 1 on lattices, and I am doing Exercise 6 in Section §4: If $L$ is an algebraic lattice and $D$ a subset of $L$ such that for each $d_1$, $d_2 \in D$ ...
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31 views

Does $\mathbf{Tos}$ generate $\mathbf{DLat}$ as a variety?

Let $\mathbf{DLat}$ denote the variety of distributive lattices and let $\mathbf{Tos}$ denote the subclass of $\mathbf{DLat}$ consisting of the totally-ordered sets. Question. Does $\mathbf{Tos}$ ...
4
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1answer
123 views

How can you actually do universal algebra with monads?

Instead of digging deep into "classical" universal algebra, it seems more interesting or fruitful to look at universal algebra categorically. This should be doable with monads, since every category of ...
4
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1answer
116 views

Are there any free or fascist boolean algebras?

A boolean algebra is an algebra with the binary operations $\wedge$, $\vee$, an unary operation $\neg$, and constants $0$, and $1$, satisfying axioms. A heyting algebra is an algebra with the binary ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Prime ideal theorem for modular lattices?

There's a well-known theorem for distributive lattices commonly referred to as the "prime ideal theorem:" Let $L$ be a distributive lattice, $I$ an ideal of $L$, and $F$ a filter of $L$ such that ...
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1answer
54 views

Vector spaces as free algebras

Exercise 4.6 of An algebraic introduction to mathematical logic asks: $K$ is a field. Show that vector spaces over $K$ form a variety $V$ of algebras, and that every space over $K$ is a free algebra ...
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1answer
82 views

Does a power-complete finite pasture exist?

Suppose we define a pasture to be an algebraic structure $\langle M, 0, +, \times, \wedge \rangle$ where $\langle M, 0, +, \times \rangle$ is a ring (not necessarily commutative or unital) $\wedge$ ...
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55 views

Is there a systematic way of “discovering” an algebra from observations of its universe?

I am faced with the following situation: I have a finite set of some $m$ positive integers $Q^m \in \mathbb{N}$ These integers go through a series of $N$ possible black boxes that transform them. ...
2
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1answer
58 views

A generalized Boolean algebra gives rise to an implication algebra

A generalized Boolean algebra $G$ is relatively complemented distributive lattice with largest element 1. That is, an element $a\in G$ has a complement in any interval $[x\,,\,1]$ that contains ...
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1answer
86 views

Aside from the obvious stuff, do the partial functions that solve the quadratic equation have any interesting properties?

Let us define partial functions $$f_+,f_- : \mathbb{R} \leftarrow \mathbb{R} \times \mathbb{R} \times \mathbb{R}$$ so as to return the zeros of the quadratic $ax^2+bx+c$ whenever they exist, such ...
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2answers
122 views

Classification of Finite Topologies

Does there exist a classification of finite topologies? I define a finite topology as a finite Set $T$ of Sets which respects the following properties: $\forall a,b \in T: a \cap b \in T$, ...
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0answers
42 views

Optimal object in category? Metric, objective function on category objects. Optimization over category?

Is there notion about optimal object in category (that can be found by some algorithms, or - more importantly - that can be constructed (if unknown) by some algorithms), about metric and objective ...
4
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1answer
75 views

What does it mean if a free algebra has an unsolvable word problem?

I wonder how hard identity testing (similar to polynomial identity testing) can be for a free algebra. I thought that in a certain sense, the problem should always be semi-decidable, because the free ...
3
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1answer
82 views

A conjecture in equational logic

In an algebra with a single binary operation g, is there a single equational identity that generates the same set of identities as the set {g(x,y)=g(y,x) , g(g(x,y),z)=g(x,g(y,z))}? My conjecture is ...
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68 views

Existential and Universal Equivalence Proof

Taking ¬∀x:X.r≡∃x:X.¬r Is there a way of actually formally proving this? Not implementing it but proving how to go from a negated universal quantifier to a an existential with a negated element... ...
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1answer
34 views

Free commutative ring functor

The free commutative ring on a set $X$ is the polynomial ring with variables the elements of $X$. This polynomial ring is the free (additive) abelian group on the free (multiplicative) abelian monoid ...
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1answer
47 views

'Finitely presented' implies 'always finite presented' for algebraic theories

In this MO question it is proven the answer is yes for modules. The proof given relies on the snake lemma, which does not generally make sense in the category of rings, groups, monoids, etc. It seems ...
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0answers
30 views

Coproduct in the category of $\Omega$-algebras [duplicate]

Let $\Omega$ be a type (or signature, depending on your terminology), and let $\mathbf {\Omega Alg}$ be the category of $\Omega$-algebras. What is the coproduct in this category? G. Bergman's "An ...
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3answers
54 views

What does it mean that in a factor/quotient group certain elements get “glued” together

In these these notes on the generalized quaternion group it is written that: [...] $Q_{2^n}$ is made by taking a cyclic group of order $2^{n-1}$ and a cyclic group of order $4$ and "glueing" them ...