0
votes
2answers
115 views

Is Continuum Hypothesis false? [closed]

The continuum hypothesis states that there is no set whose cardinality is strictly between that of the integers and the real numbers. However, it seems that it is possible to construct sets that ...
1
vote
3answers
141 views

Why are irrational numbers uncountable and rationals contable?

Question 1: Why are irrational numbers uncountable and rationals contable? I really struggle to understand this. I initially thought it had something to with the fact that between any two numbers ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

Understanding countable ordinals (as trees, step by step)

Even though ordinal numbers – considered as transitive sets – are perfect non-trees, it is worth (and natural) to visualize them as trees, starting from the finite ones which are given as ...
6
votes
2answers
210 views

On the Continuum Hypothesis

Let me start out by saying that I am not a mathematician. I read an article over at Scientific American that discussed the Continuum Hypothesis. I developed the following thought experiment that would ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Aren't two infinite graphs always identical?

Suppose you have an infinite graph $G$. I assume $G$ to be cubic and planar. No further conditions, so it will be irregular, maybe in the sense of cubic planar version of Rado's graph: Every possible ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Is there an element in $^* \Bbb N$ is Dedekind-infinite?

One definition of a finite set is that it can be injected into an initial segment of $ \Bbb N$, thus any $n$ in $\Bbb N$ is finite. Accordingly, if it's legitmate to define every element in $^* \Bbb ...
4
votes
3answers
231 views

Why the need of Axiom of Countable Choice?

Two theorems: $(1)$ Countable Union of Countable Sets is Countable $(2)$ Cartesian Product of Countable Sets is Countable Linked are the formal proofs on Proofwiki. I do not understand why they ...
6
votes
2answers
251 views

Is the proper class of all ordinals equivalent to the potential infinity of pre-Cantor times?

My understanding is that the class of all ordinals is, by definition a proper class. This in the end is done to avoid a paradox: the collection of all sets would be paradoxical if you allow it to be a ...
1
vote
0answers
110 views

Relationship between ordinals and rank of well founded relations on $\mathbb N$

I want to understand the relation between ordinals and well founded relations on $\mathbb N$. I found a nice starting point here cut-the-knot/ordinals. Ordinals start like this 0={}, 1={0}, 2={0,1}, ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Is there an infinite sequence AB, BC, CD, DX, …, YZ

Is it possible to construct an infinite set of ordered pairs of form S = {(A, B), (B, C), (C, D), (D, x), ..., (y, Z)}? Every element (B, C...) must appear only once as the first object in one of the ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Finding an element of the intersection of an infinite sequence of “compatible” sets of infinite sequences

Let $A$ be a set. Let $A^\omega$ denote the set of infinite sequences of members of $A$ (i.e., functions from $\omega$ to $A$). Define $\omega_n = \omega \setminus \{n\}$. Let $A^\omega_n$ denote the ...
5
votes
4answers
230 views

Is the powerset of every Dedekind-finite set Dedekind-finite?

Is the powerset of every Dedekind-finite set Dedekind-finite? I think this statement can be written in $\textbf{Set}$: If every mono (=injection) $f: A \to A$ is iso (=bijection), then every mono ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Prove that if a set is Peano finite, then it is Dedekind finite.

I understand that this should be done by induction, but I have very limited knowledge on proof by induction. Could someone explain it in a way which also makes clear exactly what each stage of ...
6
votes
1answer
283 views

Can an infinite cardinal number be a sum of two smaller cardinal number?

Let $\kappa$ be an infinite cardinal number. My question is whether there are $\lambda$ and $\mu$ such that both $<\kappa$ but $\lambda+\mu=\kappa$? If AC holds, then the answer is definitely ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Contour Infinites and Vector Spaces

We usually define Hilbert or finite dimensional vector spaces, and even topologies or differential geometry on $\mathbb{R}^n$ , so I wonder what is the implication of doing that on some extended ...
-1
votes
2answers
222 views

How large is the infinity of real numbers [closed]

Umm ... Can someone disprove my proof that there are aleph-1 number of real numbers? Even comments to make my proof more rigorous are welcome. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1fz28jlwrprh4jv/rhA7Ad7OtX
2
votes
4answers
240 views

An infinite set having “one more element” than another infinite set

A classic example of homeomorphism is between a sphere missing one point and a plane To see this, place a sphere on the plane so that the sphere is tangent to the plane. Given any point in the plane, ...
6
votes
6answers
1k views

Why accept the axiom of infinity?

According to my readings, Russell showed that a principle Frege used to reduce Peano arithmetic to logic lead to a contradiction. So, Russell tried to reduce mathematics to logic a different way but ...
2
votes
1answer
169 views

Can we get uncountable ordinal numbers through constructive method?

As we know, $2^{\aleph_0}$ is a limit ordinal number, however, it is greater than $\omega$, $\omega+\omega$, $\omega \cdot \omega$, $\omega^\omega$, $\omega\uparrow\uparrow\omega$, and even $\omega ...
13
votes
1answer
502 views

Is there an absolute notion of the infinite?

Skolem's paradox has been explained by the proposition that the notion of countability is not absolute in first-order logic. Intuitively, that makes sense to me, as a smaller model of ZFC might not be ...
5
votes
6answers
430 views

Book/article/tutorial as an introduction to Cardinality

I study CS, but on the first semester I have a lot of mathematics. Of course, there is an introduction to set theory and logic. Recently, we had lectures about cardinality, different kinds of ...
5
votes
1answer
599 views

Cardinality of a set that consists of all existing cardinalities

I have taken a look at the following topics: number of infinite sets with different cardinalities Cardinality of all cardinalities Are there uncountably infinite orders of infinity? Types of ...
55
votes
6answers
3k views

Why is $\omega$ the smallest $\infty$?

I am comfortable with the different sizes of infinities and Cantor's "diagonal argument" to prove that the set of all subsets of an infinite set has cardinality strictly greater than the set itself. ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Are there uncountably infinite orders of infinity?

Given a set $S$, one can easily find a set with greater cardinality -- just take the power set of $S$. In this way, one can construct a sequence of sets, each with greater cardinality than the last. ...
8
votes
8answers
2k views

What is larger — the set of all positive even numbers, or the set of all positive integers?

We will call the set of all positive even numbers E and the set of all positive integers N. At first glance, it seems obvious ...