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13 views

Probability of Measurement in a QM System - Angular Momentum and Spin

below is my question. Please read Question 2; I have done Q1, but Q2 references Q1, hence it is included. I think I have done the first part ($j=1/2$): $m = \pm {1 \over 2}$ as $-j \le m \le ...
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0answers
17 views

Interesting question about a measurement using $J^2$

I really dont understand how to do part d)iv) on this question. This seems strange as it is only worth 2 marks? What step am I missing, I feel this may be rather obvious to others. for part d)i) I ...
4
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0answers
44 views

Standard deviation of a quantum walk?

The standard deviation of a classical random walk with $n$ steps is $\sqrt n$ - Standard deviation of a random walk. I have read in many places that the standard deviation of a quantum walk $n$ with a ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Probability distribution of two party quantum states

I am going through a blog post written by Thomas Vidick. It states following three assumptions by Bell. Measurement independence (“free will”): the state $\lambda$ is independent of ${x,y}$ (since ...
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0answers
57 views

Quantum mechanics/Probability Question?

I have a 6 question homework from my Quantum Mechanics Class and I solved most of it (or at least attempted most of it). This one however is tripping me up. Any help would be appreciated. A 3D ...
1
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1answer
57 views

What is the notation for separable states or independent variables?

Is there any specific notation that two quantum states are separable or that two random variables are independent?
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0answers
63 views

Convolutions of Path Integrals of Gaussian Functions

I was looking at a question on a physics forum (http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/45955/splitting-light-into-colors-mathematical-expression-fourier-transforms) and I wanted a more ...
6
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1answer
185 views

'Quantum' approach to classical probability

Quantum mechanics defines a state of a system as a superposition of 'classical' states with complex coefficients, thus reducing many problems to linear algebra. Can classical statistics be approached ...