4
votes
2answers
79 views

Showing $\sin{\frac{\pi}{13}} \cdot \sin{\frac{2\pi}{13}} \cdot \sin{\frac{3\pi}{13}} \cdots \sin{\frac{6\pi}{13}} = \frac{\sqrt{13}}{64}$

I would like to show that $$ \sin{\frac{\pi}{13}} \cdot \sin{\frac{2\pi}{13}} \cdot \sin{\frac{3\pi}{13}} \cdots \sin{\frac{6\pi}{13}} = \frac{\sqrt{13}}{64} $$ I've been working on this for a few ...
4
votes
2answers
75 views

Coefficients of $(x-1)(x-2)\cdots(x-k)$

I'm interested in the coefficients of $x$ in the expansion of, $$ (x-1)(x-2)\cdots(x-k) = x^k + P_1(k) x^{k-1} + P_2(k)x^{k-2} + \cdots + P_k(k),$$ Where $k$ is an integer. In particular I am ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Proof of “factorization of polynomials” using only Complex Analysis

I ask for the proof of the following: If $p$ is a polynomial with degree $n\ge 1$ and zeros in $A\subseteq \mathbb C$ whose order (multiplicity) is given by $n:A\to \mathbb N^*$ then $A$ is finite ...
10
votes
2answers
235 views

Prove $\sum_{k=0}^n \binom{n}{k}(-1)^k \frac{x}{x+k} = \prod_{k=1}^n \frac{k}{x+k}$ and more

The current issue (vol. 120, no. 6) of the American Mathematical Monthly has a proof by probabilistic means that $$\sum_{k=0}^n \binom{n}{k}(-1)^k \frac{x}{x+k} = \prod_{k=1}^n \frac{k}{x+k} $$ for ...
6
votes
2answers
670 views

How was Euler able to create an infinite product for sinc by using its roots?

In the Wikipedia page for the Basel problem, it says that Euler, in his proof, found that $$\begin{align*} \frac{\sin(x)}{x} &= \left(1 - \frac{x}{\pi}\right)\left(1 + \frac{x}{\pi}\right)\left(1 ...
3
votes
2answers
122 views

Closed form for $\prod_{1 \leq i < j \leq k} (j - i)$?

Is there a closed form for $\prod_{1 \leq i < j \leq k} (j - i)$? It looks like something like a determinant of a Vandermonde matrix, but I can't seem to get it to fit.
1
vote
1answer
208 views

Efficient calculation of polynomial product

I have 2 polynomials $p_1(x_1,\ldots,x_n)$ and $p_2(x_1,\ldots,x_n)$, of which I have to compute the product, with a special property: The exponent of each variable is always either $0$ or $1$, where ...