Use this tag only if your question is about the modern theoretical footing for probability, for example probability spaces, random variables, law of large numbers, and central limit theorems. Use [tag:probability] instead for specific problems and explicit computations. Use ...

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3
votes
1answer
55 views
+50

Why has the Stein operator for normal approximations the form $(\mathcal Af)(x)=f^\prime(x)-xf(x)$?

My Question: Why has the Stein operator $\mathcal A$ for normal approximations the form $(\mathcal Af)(x)=f^\prime(x)-xf(x)$? How can one deduce this form of the operator? Reason for my question: I ...
7
votes
1answer
77 views
+100

Mean value theorem for random variables (inside an expectation value)

In a proof I am trying to understand a mean value theorem for random variables is used. It is stated that $$E[f(X+Y)]=E[f(X)+E[f^\prime(X+\theta Y)]Y]$$ for real valued random variables $X$ and $Y$ ...
4
votes
0answers
36 views
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Estimates for the normal approximation of the binomial distribution

I'm interested in estimates of the normal approximation for binomial distributions, i.e. in estimates of $$\sup_{x\in\mathbb R}\left|P\left(\frac{B(p,n)-np}{\sqrt{npq}} \le x\right) - ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views
+50

Result of a $2D$ random walk with position dependent probabilities

I was just wondering about $2D$ random walks when I got the idea of a position dependent $2D$ random walk: A man is initially at $(x,y)$ and can move in a line parallel to the X and Y-axis only. ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views
+50

Probability of absorption of a biased random walk when the starting point has binomial distribution

Consider a random walk $\{0,1, ... , N\}$ with up probability $p$ and down probability of $p-1$ where $p \neq 1/2$. Suppose there are absorbing barriers at $0$ and $N$ and that the starting point, ...
7
votes
0answers
56 views
+50

Probabilistic interpretation for representation of unity using the zeta function

There's a cute identity, I believe due to Borwein, Bradley and Crandall (Section 4): $$1=\sum_{n=2}^\infty (\zeta(n)-1).$$ There are some generalizations in the linked paper as well. Question: Is ...