0
votes
1answer
57 views

Fibonacci Numbers in Nature

Supposedly the Fibonacci sequence appears naturally in nature, and my question is how, where and I guess why? I read that one way this is so is that it models the population of honey bees under ideal ...
5
votes
5answers
393 views

About Trigonometry

Is there anything cool about trigonometry? I was just curious. I'm learning trig right now and I often find myself asking myself, "What's the point?" I feel if I knew what I was working on and why, ...
10
votes
3answers
302 views

Book series like AMS' Student Mathematical Library?

I had the joy of discovering AMS' Student Mathematical Library book series today, and I have been pleasantly surprised by how enticing some of the titles seem: exciting and expositionary, a perfect ...
17
votes
4answers
703 views

Book ref. request: “…starting from a mathematically amorphous problem and combining ideas from sources to produce new mathematics…”

I couldn't find Charles Radin's Miles of Tiles at the local university library or the public library, and cannot afford its Amazon price right now. Thus, while sorely disappointed for the moment, I ...
17
votes
3answers
1k views

An equation that generates a beautiful or unique shape for motivating students in mathematics

Could anyone here provide us an equation that generates a beautiful or unique shape when we plot? For example, this is old but gold, I found this equation on internet: $$ \large\color{blue}{ ...
2
votes
1answer
158 views

Why should we accept the existence of subsets $A$ such that neither $A$ nor $A^c$ are recursively ennumerable? And how can we persuade others?

Encode every pair $(t,x)$ (where $t$ is a Turing machine and $x$ is an input string) as a distinct natural number. Then the halting subset $H$ fails to be recursive. $$H := \{(t,x) \in \mathbb{N} ...
6
votes
4answers
716 views

Topological groups, why need them?

I'm reading through Munkres and Armstrong's books on topology. However, I find topological groups to be really complicated objects! I feel they are twice as hard to deal with then just groups and ...
2
votes
1answer
194 views

Is RCA-Rudin one of the worst textbooks? [closed]

Someone told me that "Real and complex analysis - rudin" is actually rated a bad textbook among researchers, since it gives no motivation. Is it true? I agree that this text provides less ...
18
votes
4answers
526 views

Fractional Calculus: Motivation and Foundations.

If this is too broad, I apologise; let's keep it focused on the basics if necessary. What's the motivation and the rigorous foundations behind fractional calculus? It seems very weird & ...
8
votes
2answers
197 views

Why do we want probabilities to be *countably* additive?

In probability theory, it is (as far as I am aware) universal to equate "probability" with a probabilistic measure in the sense of measure theory (possibly a particularly well behaved measure, but ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

New ways to light the fire again

Recently I've been studying a lot of analytic geometry and this subject made my motivation drop. The thing is, the courses aren't stopping and I'm beginning to lose the passion I had before. I need ...
7
votes
1answer
261 views

What is the significance of limit points?

When I had my first taste of topology a couple of years ago, our lecturer emphasized the following notions. closed set, closure, closure point open set, interior, interior point Of course, these ...
3
votes
0answers
108 views

Do expressions like $(-1)^{2/3}$ show up naturally in pure or applied math?

Let $x$ denote an arbitrary real number. Then $x^n$ makes sense for arbitrary $n \in \mathbb{N},$ via the obvious recursive definition. We can extend this definition by asserting that if $x$ is ...
3
votes
0answers
139 views

What are the advantages of proof-relevant mathematics?

I've read that Theorems in HoTT (homotopy type theory) tend to characterize the space of proofs of a proposition, rather than simply state that the corresponding type is inhabited. So, HoTT ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Big theorems in information geometry?

Working on preparing a talk on information geometry to a young finance/applied math audience. Motivating this area is turning out a little difficult. What are some big theorems or results that I ...
2
votes
1answer
182 views

Why do we need continuous random variables since they can be approximated by discrete ones?

I do not understand the motivation of developing the theory of continuous random variables. Given simple discrete random variables, the continuous ones can be well approximated.
48
votes
12answers
18k views

Why study linear algebra?

Simply as the title says. I've done some research, but still haven't arrived at an answer I am satisfied with. I know the answer varies in different fields, but in general, why would someone study ...
4
votes
1answer
291 views

A layman's motivation for non-standard analysis and generalised limits

Disclaimer: My apologies for making such a long question. The question is possibly also rather specific, but I hope that (some parts of) it might be useful in general. Background: I have recently ...
3
votes
0answers
428 views

Why is unique ergodicity important or interesting?

I have a very simple motivational question: why do we care if a measure-preserving transformation is uniquely ergodic or not? I can appreciate that being ergodic means that a system can't really be ...
17
votes
2answers
659 views

Why are modular lattices important?

A lattice $(L,\leq)$ is said to be modular when $$(\forall a,b\in L) x \leq b \implies x \vee (a \wedge b) = (x \vee a) \wedge b,$$ where $\vee$ is the join operation, and $\wedge$ is the meet ...
4
votes
3answers
286 views

Motivation for the Mapping Class Group

Question: What is the motivation for studying the mapping class group? In particular, what types of questions does it attempt to answer and what kind of invariant is it? Motivation for this ...