1
vote
1answer
43 views

What exactly is a property?

How is a property $P$ formally defined in mathematics? I mean for example if $f$ is a morphism from an object $X$ to $Y$ in some category, then somehow I feel that "has codomain $Y$" is too broad to ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

What is gained by internalizing LST (the language of set theory)?

I'm reading up on Gödels constructible universe L in the book "Constructibility" by Devlin, and by comparing his text with texts like Kunen and Jech, there is one thing in particular that he's doing ...
2
votes
4answers
153 views

Stats is not maths?

How mainstream is the claim that stats is not maths? And if it's right, how many people don't agree? Given that it's all numbers, taught by maths departments and you get maths credits for it, I ...
5
votes
5answers
623 views

Is mathematics the only language that is not subject of interpretation?

Do you know any other "language" that is used by people except mathematics and is not subject of interpretation? By subject of interpratation I mean e.g. that 1 000 000 people will undertand that 1 + ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

Separation of mathematics and metamathematics

I recall reading that it's important to separate mathematics and metamathematics. What exactly does this mean, and why is it so? I understand that this question may make no sense without more ...
54
votes
7answers
3k views

Why are all the interesting constants so small?

A quick look at the wikipedia entry on mathematical constants suggests that the most important fundamental constants all live in the immediate neighborhood of the first few positive integers. Is ...
29
votes
5answers
1k views

Why is it considered unlikely that there could be a contradiction in ZF/ZFC?

EDIT: No answer addresses the "bottleneck" question. It's not surprising to me because the question is vague. But I would like to know whether that is indeed the reason, or perhaps something else. ...
2
votes
2answers
145 views

A theorem about inductive inference

In the book 'Introduction of the theory of Statistics' by Mood,Graybill,Boes (third edition)on page 220 (Chapter 6 on Sampling) you can read: 'Inductive inference is well known to be a hazardous ...
12
votes
2answers
581 views

How rare is it that a theorem with published proof turns out to be wrong?

There is a story I read about tiling the plane with convex pentagons. You can read about it in this article on pages 1 and 2. Summary of the story: A guy showed in his doctorate work all classes of ...
5
votes
1answer
309 views

Mathematical structures

Preamble: My previous education was focused either on classical analysis (which was given in quite old traditions, I guess) or on applied Mathematics. Since I was feeling lack of knowledge in 'modern' ...
3
votes
0answers
793 views

New branches of math? [closed]

I have been wondering if math would be more enjoyable, if one was able to start a new field and come up with all the definitions, methods, etc. rather than starting where someone else ended. ...
5
votes
6answers
836 views

Why some people don't like proofs by contradiction [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are the “proofs by contradiction” weaker than other proofs? I have been active on this site for two months and on a few occasions I noticed that some people ...
8
votes
5answers
1k views

Common misconceptions about math

YARFMO (Yet another reposting from Mathoverflow) ;-) The more you know about math the more you find conceptions previously thought correct to be false: 1.) math is not as exact as many believe - in ...
33
votes
3answers
1k views

What is your method?

Many young, and not so young, mathematicians struggle with how to spend their time. Perhaps this is due to the 90%-10% rule for mathematical insight: 90 pages of work yield only 10 pages of useful ...