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Were “real numbers” used before things like Dedekind cuts, Cauchy sequences, etc. appeared?

Just the question in the title, I'm trying to understand how something like analysis could be developed without formal constructions of the real numbers. I'm also very interested, if the answer is "...
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Why is the topological pressure called pressure?

Let us consider a compact topological space $X$, and a continuous function $f$ acting on $X$. One of the most important quantities related to such a topological dynamical system is the entropy. For ...
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What is the motivation for quaternions?

I know imaginary numbers solve $x^2 +1=0$, but what is the motivation for quaternions?
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Who realized $\int \frac 1x dx =\ln(x)+c$?

Who discovered the non-obvious $\int \frac 1x dx=\ln(x)+c$ ? Were power series involved? The series look similar on opposite sides of 1: $$ \frac 1x =\sum_{n=0}^\infty (-1+x)^n \text{ for } |x-1|<...
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Is the theory of dual numbers strong enough to develop real analysis, and does it resemble Newton's historical method for doing calculus?

I've been interested in non-standard analysis recently. I was reading up on it and noticed the following interesting comment on the Wikipedia page about hyperreal numbers, right after giving an ...
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How much math education was typical in the 18th & 19th century?

Was it unusual for people in those days to learn Calculus? Could a grad student take a course in differential equations or multi-variable Calculus, or did they have to learn from journals? I am always ...
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Why is the axiom of choice separated from the other axioms?

I don't know much about set theory or foundational mathematics, this question arose just out of curiosity. As far as I know, the widely accepted axioms of set theory is the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms ...
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Math symbol in German thesis from 1963

I have the following math symbol in a German thesis written in 1963. Is it anything more than just a function name? It is used in the following context and then goes on to state that "If the ...
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Who came up with the $\varepsilon$-$\delta$ definitions and the axioms in Real Analysis?

I've seen a lot of definitions of notions like boundary points, accumulation points, continuity, etc, and axioms for the set of the real numbers. But I have a hard time accepting these as "true" ...
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Origins of the modern definition of topology

The modern definition of topology is 'a family of subsets of a set $X$ containing the empty set and $X$, closed under unions and finite intersections'. In Grundzüge der Mengenlehre (1914) Hausdorff ...
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A place to learn about math etymology?

I was recently wondering where the word `kernel' comes from in mathematics. I am sure the internet must know. I did manage to find http://www.pballew.net/etyindex.html#k which contains the origin ...
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What is magical about Cartan's magic formula?

Why is Cartan's magic formula $$\mathscr{L}_X\omega = i_Xd\omega + d(i_X\omega)$$ called "magic"? Should it be considered a highly surprising result? Does it "magically" prove several other ...
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Does there exist a copy of Euclid's Elements with modern notation and no figures?

I am working through Euclid's Elements for fun, but I find the propositions difficult to understand without referencing the provided figures. Unfortunately, the figures usually give away the proofs, ...
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Hilbert's original proof of basis theorem

Does anyone know Hilbert's original proof of his basis theorem--the non-constructive version that caused all the controversy? I know this was circa 1890, and he would have proved it for $\mathbb{C}[...
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Approximation for $\pi$

I just stumbled upon $$ \pi \approx \sqrt{ \frac{9}{5} } + \frac{9}{5} = 3.141640786 $$ which is $\delta = 0.0000481330$ different from $\pi$. Although this is a rather crude approximation I ...
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Why is the hard Lefschetz theorem “hard”?

Let $X$ be a compact Kähler manifold of complex dimension $\dim_{\mathbb C} = n$. Let $[\omega]$ be the cohomology class of a Kähler metric on $X$. Then powers of the class $[\omega]$ defines a linear ...
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What did Hilbert actually want for his second problem?

When I read about the historical background of Gödel's incompleteness theorems, it is often mentioned that he was essentially responding to Hilbert, who was trying to prove the consistency of (...
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Difference between calculus and analysis

It's somthing I always want to figure out, when did calculus start to be extended to analysis(I reformulate the question, the previous one"where one can draw a line to distinguish calculus and ...
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Did H. Lebesgue claim “1 is prime” in 1899? Source?

John Derbyshire, in his text "Prime obsession: Bernhard Riemann and the greatest unsolved problem in mathematics" states that The last mathematician of any importance who did [consider the number ...
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Why is $J$ often used to denote $\mathbb{N}$ or $\mathbb{Z}$ in older texts?

In older books, I've noticed that authors tended to use $J$ to denote (usually) the natural numbers and (less commonly) the integers. Does anyone have any idea why that might've been? A few examples ...
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What are some results that shook the foundations of one or more fields of mathematics? [closed]

An example would be the proof that $\sqrt{2}$ is not rational, which was a violation of some fundamental assumptions that mathematicians at the time made about numbers. Another would be Russell's ...
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How did the notation “ln” for “log base e” become so pervasive?

Wikipedia sez: The natural logarithm of $x$ is often written "$\ln(x)$", instead of $\log_e(x)$ especially in disciplines where it isn't written "$\log(x)$". However, some mathematicians ...
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Motivation for/history of Jacobi's triple product identity

I'm taking a short number theory course this summer. The first topic we covered was Jacobi's triple product identity. I still have no sense of why this is important, how it arises, how it might have ...
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Why is an image called an “image”?

Given a function $f : A \to B$, the image, denoted by $\operatorname{Im}f$ is the set of all $f(x)$ where $x \in A$. Why do we call this set the image? When was it first used, and what motivated its ...
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A problem V.I. Arnold solved as a primary school student

According to a 1995 interview that Vladimir I. Arnold gave to the Notices of the AMS, his primary school teacher I.V. Morozkin gave in 1949 (when Arnold was 12 years old) to a Soviet classroom, most ...
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Curious remark of D. Ravenel

In his beautiful (but difficult) book "Complex cobordism and stable homotopy groups of spheres", concerned mostly with methods of computing homotopy groups of spheres, D. Ravenel describes a general ...
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History of Modern Mathematics Available on the Internet

I have been meaning to ask this question for some time, and have been spurred to do so by Georges Elencwajg's fantastic answer to this question and the link contained therein. In my free time I ...
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Why did Gauss think the reciprocity law so important in number theory?

Gauss's Disquitiones Arithmeticae centers around the quadratic reciprocity law. It seems that he developed the genus theory of integral binary quadratic forms to find a natural proof of the quadratic ...
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What was Ramanujan's solution?

The wikipedia entry on Ramanujan contains the following passage: One of his remarkable capabilities was the rapid solution for problems. He was sharing a room with P. C. Mahalanobis who had a ...
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Matsunaga's Method for solving $x^2+y^2=p$

In his history of number theory, Dickson mentions an 18th century algorithm due to Matsunago [Sic --- he means, presumably, Matsunaga Ryohitsu a.k.a. Matsunaga Yoshisuke] for finding two numbers whose ...
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Who was Hermann Künneth?

Question as in the title: Who was Hermann Künneth? Where can I find some biographical information beyond what is available on Wikipedia? The well-known Künneth formula, for example in the form of ...
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Results that were widely believed to be false but were later shown to be true

What are some results which were widely believed to be false, but were later to be shown to be true, or vice-versa?
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What is the origin of the expression “Yoneda Lemma”?

Thank you very much in advance for telling where the expression “Yoneda Lemma” comes from. EDIT 1. On page -14 of Reprints in Theory and Applications of Categories, No. 3, 2003. Abelian Categories, ...
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Who first called the Grothendieck's schéma scheme?

Grothendieck called "schemes" schémas in French. I find it strange we call them schemes. In fact, Grothendieck called them (pre-) schemas(this is an English word) in his talk(in English) at Proceeding ...
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Did Zariski really define the Zariski topology on the prime spectrum of a ring?

The question is not: “Did Zariski really define the Zariski topology?” It is: “Did Zariski really define the Zariski topology on the prime spectrum of a ring?” Here is the motivation. --- On page ...
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Was there anybody before Cantor who conjectured existence of infinities of different sizes?

Georg Cantor is formally known as the first one who discovered existence of infinities of different sizes. But the history of thinking about the concept of "infinity" in maths and philosophy goes back ...
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where does the term “integral domain” come from?

Self-explanatory title really! A student today asked me why they were called integral domains -- and I realised that the word "integral" seems to be being used in a way totally unlike any other way I ...
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Examples of falsified (or currently open) longstanding conjectures leading to large bodies of incorrect results.

In general, the way that modern mathematical research is conducted isn't the way that many would assume is the ideal method of research. That is, mathematics is not the linear progression of ...
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History of the theory of equations: John Colson

This is an EDIT version of my original question: Recently I've been interested in the history of the Theory of Equations. The thing is that I learned about this mathematician named John Colson, he ...
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Strange old multiplication table found in Oklahoma school

Today I read an article about chalk boards from 1917 discovered in an Oklahoma school. One of the chalkboards included the following curious image: (Oklahoma City Public Schools) The article ...
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Where did the word “logarithm” come from?

Where did the word logarithm come from? Any relation to the word algorithm?
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1answer
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Why would I define Alexander–Spanier cohomology?

I think I can motivate the definitions of simplicial, singular, de Rham, Čech, and sheaf (co)homology, more or less. I might want to understand bordism, and start by trying to understand ...
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What is the most cited mathematical paper?

Just out of curiosity: What is the paper with the largest number of citations in all of mathematics? I think it is Shannon's A Mathematical Theory of ...
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A curious theorem by Peano

Let $f$ be defined on $[a,b]$ and there differentiable. Show that for every $ \epsilon>0 $ there exists a partition $\, a=a_0<a_1<...<a_n=b \,$ of $ \,[a,b] \,$ so that $$\left|\frac {f(a_{...
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When, and by whom, was “$\mathbb{C}$ is algebraically closed” dubbed the “fundamental theorem of algebra”?

Wikipedia has this enigmatic sentence on the page for the fundamental theorem of algebra: ...its name was given at a time when the study of algebra was mainly concerned with the solutions of ...
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$\sin$ vs. $sin$ - history and usage

One thing newcomers to TeX or MathJax often get wrong is that they write something like $sin(x)$ instead of $\sin(x)$ - the point being that common mathematical functions with names consisting of ...
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History of zero?

I learn't as a kid from my teachers that zero was discovered/invented in india and if you ask anybody here in india, the answer is simple yes it was invented in india. Now we have something to say ...
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About a paper of Zermelo

This about the famous article Zermelo, E., Beweis, daß jede Menge wohlgeordnet werden kann, Math. Ann. 59 (4), 514–516 (1904), available here. Edit: Springer link to the ...
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Did Gauss ever make a mistake?

I have read a bit about Gauss, who was well known for being careful in only publishing work he had perfected (or in his own words "few, but ripe"). What is interesting to me about Gauss though is that ...
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Who are some forgotten mathematicians? [closed]

In Thomas' Calculus, he presents ''Nicole Oresme's Theorem'': $$ \sum_{n=1}^\infty {n\over 2^{n-1}}=4. $$ My first reaction was "who is this person?''. As it turns out, he was a Frenchman from the $...