A lattice in $\mathbb R^n$ is a discrete subgroup of $\mathbb R^n$ or, equivalently, it is a subgroup of $\mathbb R^n$ generated by linearly independent vectors. Lattices have applications in geometric number theory, e.g. via Minkowski's theorem.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

22
votes
5answers
2k views

Pick's Theorem on a triangular (or hex) grid

Pick's theorem says that given a square grid consisting of all points in the plane with integer coordinates, and a polygon without holes and non selt-intersecting whose vertices are grid points, its ...
18
votes
5answers
1k views

Every integer vector in $\mathbb R^n$ with integer length is part of an orthogonal basis of $\mathbb R^n$

Suppose $\vec x$ is a (non-zero) vector with integer coordinates in $\mathbb R^n$ such that $\|\vec x\| \in \mathbb Z$. Is it true that there is an orthogonal basis of $\mathbb R^n$ containing $\vec x$...
15
votes
1answer
288 views

Hypercube and Hyperspheres

Let $n,k\in\mathbb{N}$. In this problem, the geometry of $\mathbb{R}^n$ is the usual Euclidean geometry. The lattice hypercube $ Q(n,k)$ is defined to be the set $ \{1,2,...,k\}^n \subseteq\...
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Integer lattice points on a sphere

Suppose we have a sphere centered at the origin of $\mathbb{R^{n}}$ with radius $r$. Are there known theorems that state the number of integer lattice points that lie on the sphere? It seems like this ...
12
votes
2answers
661 views

Show $\binom{n}{k}\binom{k}{a} = \binom{n}{a}\binom{n-a}{k-a}$ by block-walking interpretation of Pascal's triangle

A combinatorial proof for the identity $$\binom{n}{k}\binom{k}{a} = \binom{n}{a}\binom{n-a}{k-a}$$ is the following "committee" argument, which seems the most common. There are $\binom{n}{k}$ ...
12
votes
1answer
425 views

Proving a complicated inequality involving integers

Let $a,b,c,d$ be integers such that $$\left( \begin{matrix} a & b \\ c & d \end{matrix} \right) = \left( \begin{matrix} 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \end{matrix}\right) \mod 2$$ $$ ad-bc =1$$ $$\...
10
votes
1answer
288 views

Question about Pick's Theorem

Is there a Pick's Theorem for a general lattice in $\mathbb{R}^{2}$?
10
votes
2answers
884 views

Elementary proof that if $A$ is a matrix map from $\mathbb{Z}^m$ to $\mathbb Z^n$, then the map is surjective iff the gcd of maximal minors is $1$

I am trying to find an elementary proof that if $\phi$ is a linear map from $\mathbb{Z}^n\rightarrow \mathbb{Z}^m$ represented by an $m \times n$ matrix $A$, then the map is surjective iff the gcd of ...
10
votes
2answers
336 views

Proving that $T$:$(x_1,…,x_n) \rightarrow (\frac {x_1+x_2}{2},\frac {x_2+x_3}{2},…,\frac {x_n+x_1}{2})$ leads to nonintegral components

Start with $n$ paiwise different integers $x_1,x_2,...,x_n,(n>2)$ and repeat the following step: $T$:$(x_1,...,x_n) \rightarrow (\frac {x_1+x_2}{2},\frac {x_2+x_3}{2},...,\frac {x_n+x_1}{2})$ ...
10
votes
0answers
285 views

How small parallelograms are we guaranteed to get, when we select the two sides from different plane lattices?

This a shortened version (motivation from telecommunications stripped away) of a question I asked in MO in late May (no answers). I am mostly checking, if somebody has seen this or a related question ...
9
votes
2answers
773 views

Generalizing the 290 theorem.

I have only just come across the remarkable theorem of Conway about universal quadratic forms over $\mathbb{Z}$; namely that in determining whether a integer coefficient, positive definite quadratic ...
9
votes
1answer
581 views

Path (Feynman) Integrals over Graphs

I was thinking about Feynman integrals the other day and in particular about discretizing the paths. Does anyone know the lay of the land about what happens when you do path integrals over, say, a ...
9
votes
1answer
407 views

“Center-of-Mass” of lattice polygons (generalization of Pick's theorem)

Call a polygon with integer coordinates (in the Euclidean plane) a 'lattice polygon'. Pick's Theorem allows you to efficiently compute the number of lattice points inside this polygon given just its ...
9
votes
1answer
169 views

Modular parametrization of elliptic curve

Let $f$ be a cusp form of weight $2$ on $\Gamma_0(N)$ and assume that $f$ is a Hecke form and a newform. Then, we easily see that $$C(\gamma)=2i\pi \int_{\tau}^{\gamma \tau}{f(\tau')d\tau'} \quad (\...
8
votes
2answers
5k views

Lattice paths and Catalan Numbers

Starting in the top left corner of a 2×2 grid, and only being able to move to the right and down, there are exactly 6 routes to the bottom right corner. How many such routes are there through a 20×...
8
votes
2answers
321 views

Show that the matrix $A$ with integer entries is injective on the reals to $\mathbb{R}^m$ iff it is injective on the integer lattice.

Show that the $m \times n$ matrix $A$ with integer entries is an injective linear map from $\mathbb{R}^n$ to $\mathbb{R}^m$ iff it is injective as a linear map from $\mathbb{Z}^n$ to $\mathbb{Z}^m$. ...
8
votes
1answer
92 views

The lattice points in the real cone of some semigroups are just the integer cone of that semigroup.

I'm trying to solve an exercise in Fulton's book on toric varieties, and have reduced it to the following: Let $M$ be a lattice of rank $n$ with $M \otimes \mathbb{R} = V$, and $S$ be a finitely ...
7
votes
1answer
92 views

Does the determinant give you the index over $\mathcal{O}_k$ as well as over $\mathbb{Z}$?

It is a standard fact that if $M$ is a nonsingular $n\times n$ integer matrix, the index of the $\mathbb{Z}$-span of its columns as an abelian group in $\mathbb{Z}^n$ is $|\det M|$. What happens if we ...
7
votes
1answer
122 views

What is the limit $\lim\limits_{(x,y)\to(1,1),\ (x,y)\in S}(1-x^py^q)(1-x^ry^s)\sum_{p/q\le m/n\le r/s}x^my^n$?

Let $S=[0,1)^2$ and $m,n$ are positive integers and $p/q,r/s$ are positive rationals with $p/q<r/s$. What is the limit $$\lim\limits_{(x,y)\to(1,1),\ (x,y)\in S}(1-x^py^q)(1-x^ry^s)\sum_{p/q\le m/n\...
7
votes
1answer
70 views

Orbits of action of $SL_m(\mathbb{Z})$ on $\mathbb{Z}^m$

I'm considering the action of $SL_m(\mathbb{Z})$ on $\mathbb{Z}^m$: if $A\in SL_m(\mathbb{Z})$ and $v\in\mathbb{Z}^m$, then $Av\in\mathbb{Z}^m$. My question is: what are the orbits of this action? I'...
6
votes
2answers
65 views

Which planar angles on an integer lattice are possible?

As shown in this question, you can construct an angle $A$ on 3 integer points on a plane only if $\tan A$ is rational. A natural generalization is to ask which values can planar angles based on 3 ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

Integer solutions (lattice points) to arbitrary circles

Wolfram Alpha will provide integer solutions to arbitrary circle equations. I'm trying to understand how it's able to calculate them, but despite a fair bit of digging I haven't found any discussion ...
6
votes
1answer
104 views

How to eliminate some edges of a lattice to get exactly k paths?

We have an $n$ by $n$ lattice. We want to find a way to eliminate some edges, so that there are exactly $k$ paths from $(1,1)$ to $(n,n)$ of length $2n-2$. (this means our paths should be NE). I don't ...
6
votes
1answer
125 views

Power Functions on the Integers

Suppose $f:\mathbb{R}\to\mathbb{R}$ is of the form $f(x)=x^a$ for some $a\in\mathbb{R}^{+}$. If $f(\mathbb{Z})\subset\mathbb{Z}$, show that $a\in\mathbb{Z}$. Source: A friend posed this problem; not ...
5
votes
2answers
347 views

Proving this identity $\sum_k\frac{1}{k}\binom{2k-2}{k-1}\binom{2n-2k+1}{n-k}=\binom{2n}{n-1}$ using lattice paths

How can I prove the identity $\sum_k\frac{1}{k}\binom{2k-2}{k-1}\binom{2n-2k+1}{n-k}=\binom{2n}{n-1}$? I have to prove it using lattice paths, it should be related to Catalan numbers The $n$th ...
5
votes
1answer
715 views

Shortest Non-Zero Vector in Integer Lattices with Given Points

There are two questions related to the shortest non zero vector problem that have left me scratching my head. Please bear with me as I describe the problem. Disclaimer: this is homework. For the ...
5
votes
1answer
207 views

Bézout's identity in higher dimensions?

I have an invertible rational matrix $C\in\text{GL}(n,\mathbb{Q})$ which works on lattice $\mathbb{Z}^{n}$. Can I write the resulting set in the following form $$C\cdot \mathbb{Z}^{n}=X\cdot \mathbb{Z}...
5
votes
1answer
140 views

Complex elliptic curve for the “conjugate” lattice

Let $\Lambda$ be a lattice in $\mathbb{C}$, and $E=\mathbb{C}/\Lambda$ the corresponding complex elliptic curve. Let $\bar{\Lambda}$ be the "conjugate" lattice, i.e. the one obtained by conjugating (...
5
votes
1answer
60 views

Size of closed loop on a (bipartite) hexagonal lattice with equal number of enclosed A and B sublattice sites.

If I draw closed loops on a hexagonal lattice such that it always encloses equal number of A and B sublattice sites, I seem to get loops of sizes 4n+2. Is there a way this can be proved in general? ...
5
votes
1answer
204 views

The lattice points of a f.g. rational cone form a f.g. monoid.

In their book "Polytopes, Rings, and K-Theory" Bruns and Gubeladze sketch an alternative approach to Gordan's Lemma, which is stated in the headline (f.g. = finitely generated). I don't understand the ...
5
votes
1answer
322 views

Convergence of Sum over Integer Lattice

Does the sum $$\sum_{z \in \mathbb{Z}^3\setminus \{(0,0,0)\}} \left( \frac{1}{|{\bf x} - {\bf z}|^2} - \frac{1}{|{\bf z}|^2} \right)$$ converge pointwise or even uniformly for $\varepsilon < |{\bf ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

How to count lattice points on a line.

How can we count the number of lattice point on a line, given that the endpoints of the lines are themselves lattice points? I really can't think of how counting lattice points would work, so please ...
4
votes
1answer
457 views

Which internal angles can a lattice polygon have?

I am wondering if for a lattice polygon an internal angle can take any value? If no which ones not and why? I guess there will be some restrictions due to the discrete nature of the grid but I am ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

Ideals of $\mathbb{Z}[i]$ geometrically

It is pretty easy to visualize the ideals of $\mathbb{Z}$ in the "integer line". Let's go up to $\mathbb{Z}[i]$ and consider the ideal $3\cdot\mathbb{Z}[i]$. We can visualize it as a "sub-lattice" ...
4
votes
2answers
340 views

Guaranteeing an integer lattice point centroid

My question is this: Writing $n(4)$ to be the minimum number of integer lattice points in the plane so that some four of them must determine an integer lattice point centroid, show that $n(4)=13$. I ...
4
votes
1answer
295 views

What is the easiest way to describe the Leech lattice explicitly?

I am aware that the Leech lattice is the unique even unimodular lattice in $\mathbb{R}^{24}$ with no norm $2$ vectors. However I am after a way to describe this lattice explicitly without reference ...
4
votes
1answer
212 views

Is there an algorithm to find a basis for the lattice $V \cap \Bbb{Z}^n$ given a basis for $V \subseteq \Bbb{Q}^n$?

This might be a stupid/very simple question, but since I can't quite seem to come up with a nice trick I will ask it anyway. Assume that we have a vectorspace $V \subseteq \mathbb{Q}^n$ given in the ...
4
votes
2answers
769 views

Projection of a lattice onto a subspace

Let $G$ be a $n \times n$ matrix with real entries and let $\Lambda = \{x^n \colon \exists i^n \in \mathbb{Z}^n \text{ such that } x^n = G \cdot i^n\}$ define a lattice. I am interested in projecting ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Determining if $\mathbb{Z}[a]$ is a discrete subring of $\mathbb{C}$.

Let $a \in \mathbb{C}$ and consider the ring $\mathbb{Z}[a]$. Is there some nice criterion which will tell me whether $\mathbb{Z}[a]$ is discrete in the sense that there is some $\delta >0$ such ...
4
votes
2answers
159 views

Placing a circle in a square lattice

Two part question. Consider the square lattice $\mathbb{Z}^2$: Imagine you are going to place a circle of radius $r$ somewhere in $\mathbb{R}^2$. Question 1: What is the radius of the largest ...
4
votes
1answer
230 views

Algebraic proof of Ehrhart's theorem

Let $P \subset \mathbb{R}^d$ be a $d$-dimensional polytope, where all vertices lie on integral coordinates, and let $L(P,n)$ denote the number of integral lattice points contained in the scaled ...
4
votes
1answer
108 views

Lattice in a vector space of dim 2 over a valuated field.

I'm reading "Arbres, amalgames et SL2" of J.P. Serre, and something is not clear to me, but is to him :) Let $k$ be a field, with a discrete valuation $v$, ie a group epimorphism $v:k^\ast \to \...
4
votes
1answer
576 views

Good textbooks for lattice and coding theory

I am looking for good textbooks for lattice and coding theory. Lattice and coding theory are very interesting on their own, but I have application of the theory to K3 surfaces & modular forms (and ...
4
votes
2answers
98 views

Count the number of elements of ring [closed]

1/ How to count the number of elements of $\mathbb{Z}[i]/(1+2i)^n$? 2/ How to write $\mathbb{Z}[i]/(1+2i)^n$ as direct sum of cyclic groups (in view of the structure theorem of finite abelian ...
4
votes
1answer
36 views

What is the significance of $SL(2, \mathbb{R} / SL(2, \mathbb{Z}))$ in studying lattices in geometry of numbers?

I was listening to a talk about lattices and the geometry of numbers and at one point they jumped from discussing a 2d lattice into discussing $SL(2, \mathbb{R})\ /\ SL(2, \mathbb{Z}))$ and it was not ...
4
votes
1answer
52 views

Integer solutions to a two variable equation.

For $m, n \in \mathbb{Z}$, show the only integer solutions to $f(m,n) = \displaystyle \frac{3^m(2^n+1)-2^{m+n}}{2^{m+n}-3^{m+1}}$ are $f(1, 2) = -7$, $f(0, 1) = -1$, and $f(0, 2) = 1$. More ...
4
votes
2answers
322 views

Number of self-avoiding rook walks in a rectangular grid

I was wondering how many self-avoiding rook walks there are on an $m×n$ grid. A self-avoiding rook walk is a path from the bottom left corner to the top right corner of the grid, composed only of ...
4
votes
2answers
81 views

Looking for references on 'non-discrete lattices'

A lattice in $\mathbb{R}^n$ is a discrete subgroup that spans $\mathbb{R}^n$. Recently I've been running into a similar sort of object consisting of more than $n$ vectors in $\mathbb{R}^n$ and their $\...
4
votes
0answers
91 views

Unimodular matrix to increase the minimum eigenvalue

Given a positive definite matrix $P$, I would like to find a unimodular matrix $U$ so that $U P U^T$ raises the minimum eigenvalue as much as possible. How can one find such a matrix $U$?
4
votes
0answers
42 views

Finding the odometer function of an abelian sandpile

As a computer scientist and "armchair" mathematician, I'm trying to replicate the images found here of Abelian sandpiles on a square lattice, where the initial configuration is $n$ chips on a single ...