1
vote
1answer
31 views

Why are isotropy groups named as such?

Why are isotropy groups, also known as stabilizers, named as such? In physics, the word isotropy means having the same property in all directions. Can one draw an analogy from this to interpret the ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Notation for permutation corresponding to the action of a group element

Let $G \times X \to X,\ \ (g,x) \mapsto g.x$ be an action of $G$ on $X$, i.e., $e.x = x$ for all $x \in X$; $gh.x = g.(h.x)$ for all $g \in G$, $x \in X$. For a fixed $g \in G$, how should I refer ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

Terminology on group actions

Johnson, D. L. "Minimal permutation representations of finite groups." Amer. J. Math. 93 (1971), 857-866. My knowledge of group theory is undergraduate-level stuff. I'm looking at the paper cited ...
5
votes
0answers
128 views

Why are they called orbits?

When we study actions in group theory, we consider sets of the form $$\text{Orb}_G(x)=\{gx\mid g\in G\} $$ that are called orbits. Although, the only reason I find convincing for that name is that in ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

$G$-set terminology

When a group action $G \times X \rightarrow X$ is defined with a group $G$ and a set $X$, why is there not a special name for the set $X$? I know that this is referred to as a $G$-set, but the set $X$ ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

What does “lifted action” mean?

I read about angular moment and linear moment but I don't know what "lifted action" means. Can you explain please? Thanks. :)
3
votes
1answer
102 views

Motivation for the term “transitive” group action

I have two questions: In a text, I read that a group permutes pairs of faces of a solid transitively. Geometrically, what are they referring to, and what is an example of when a group may not ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Definition of tautological action

What is the precise meaning of the term 'tautological action' as used for example in this Wikipedia page in the context of semigroup actions? For reference the particular sentence is: "A ...