5
votes
0answers
70 views

Converse to Lefschetz fixed point theorem (counterexample)

The celebrated Lefschetz fixed point theorem, in its simplest form, says (following Wikipedia) that if $f\colon X \to X$ is a continuous map of a compact triangulable space $X$ to itself, then $f$ has ...
5
votes
2answers
641 views

Opposite of a contraction mapping

I am taking Real Analysis and we recently went over the Banach Fixed-point Theorem, also commonly known as the Contraction Mapping Theorem which states: If $(X,d)$ is a complete metric space, and ...
3
votes
2answers
885 views

Contraction mapping does not hold in metric space

Let $X=\mathbb{Q}\cap [1,2]$, i.e $X$ is the set of rational number between 1 and 2 inclusive. We can consider $X$ to be a metric space by endowing it with the usual distance function, i.e for $x,y ...
4
votes
1answer
515 views

Continuous bijections from the open unit disc to itself - existence of fixed points

I'm wondering about the following: Let $f:D \mapsto D$ be a continuous real-valued bijection from the open unit disc $\{(x,y): x^2 + y^2 <1\}$ to itself. Does f necessarily have a fixed point? I ...