For questions related to Euler's constant $\gamma$, which is defined to be the limiting difference between the natural logarithm and the harmonic series.

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2answers
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How can an imaginary equation give a real answer?

I came across this equation, $$ e^{ix} = \cos(x) + i\sin(x) $$ This is the simplified version, the real one is more complex but this part is the one I have a question about. The right side clearly has ...
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1answer
319 views

Why is $e$ close to $H_8$, closer to $H_8\left(1+\frac{1}{80^2}\right)$ and even closer to $\gamma+log\left(\frac{17}{2}\right) +\frac{1}{10^3}$?

The eighth harmonic number happens to be close to $e$. $$e\approx2.71(8)$$ $$H_8=\sum_{k=1}^8 \frac{1}{k}=\frac{761}{280}\approx2.71(7)$$ This leads to the almost-integer $$\frac{e}{H_8}\approx1....
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1answer
35 views

Find the region R for which the sequence converges

Find the region $(x,y) \in R$ for which the following sequence converges $$\left| e^n\frac{(\sqrt{y}-\sqrt{x})^{2n}}{x^n} \right| \to 0$$ I am currently doing number theory research on studying the ...
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0answers
41 views

Representation of e

I was on this wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_representations_of_e which has a list of representations of the constant e. I came across this one representation that looked ...
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0answers
114 views

Mertens Constant and Euler–Mascheroni constant

I found this titillating equation: $$M = \gamma + \sum_{p} \left[ \ln\! \left( 1 - \frac{1}{p} \right) + \frac{1}{p} \right]$$ where $\displaystyle M=\lim_{n \rightarrow \infty } \left( \sum_{p\,\leq ...
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0answers
76 views

Series for Stieltjes constants from $\gamma= \sum_{n=1}^\infty \left(\frac{2}{n}-\sum_{j=n(n-1)+1}^{n(n+1)} \frac{1}{j}\right)$

Euler's constant has the following representations (Euler-Mascheroni constant expression, further simplification, http://math.stackexchange.com/a/129808/134791, Question on Macys formula for Euler-...
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0answers
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About Abel Summation

http://arxiv.org/pdf/math/0504289v3.pdf Here i'm trying to understand page 5. Writer uses the abel sum to find the sum of the prime's reciprocals. So he founds the formula (2.2.1) Now here y=2 x=x......
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0answers
124 views

Continued fraction of $\gamma+1$ using recursion

Number $\gamma,$ the Euler-Mascheroni constant, is defined as the value of $$\gamma = \lim_{n\to\infty} \sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k} - \ln(n).$$ We know that $$\lim_{n\to\infty} \frac{n}{\pi(n)}-\ln(n)=-...
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0answers
173 views

Help with interesting sum involving Euler's constant

Wikipedia gives an interesting infinite sum for Euler's constant $\gamma$ and I was wondering how one would evaluate this interesting sum. The sum is given as follows: Let $N_0 (x)$ and $N_1 (x)$ ...
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Different Type of Euler's Circuit and Path (Different Looking Graph)

So I have become familiar with the basic graphs that have dots, and lines connection dot to dot. I know that a Euler's circuit is touching every edge of a graph once, and returning to the same point, ...
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0answers
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How to simplify this representation of $\gamma$?

I have a function of two variables, $Z(n,m) = (-1)^m \left( \frac{1}{m-2^n} + \frac{1}{2^n \log (2^n /m)} \right)$, and the infinite sum $\sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \sum_{m=1}^{2^n -1} Z(n,m) = \gamma$, the ...
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0answers
37 views

Transform cos to e function

What are the steps in order to transform the cosine function to the exponential function: $$ \left[\cos \left(\frac{k \pi} N\right)\right]^n \approx e ^ {\frac{-n}2 \left(\frac{k \pi} N \right)^2} $$...
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0answers
46 views

Evaluating $\int{e^{-t^{2}}\,dt}$

Let $f(x) = e^{x}$, which, expressed as a Maclaurin series, is equal to: $$\sum_{i = 0}^{\infty}{\frac{x^{i}}{i!}}$$ Therefore, $f(-t^{2})$ gives: $$\sum_{i = 0}^{\infty}{\frac{(-t^{2})^{i}}{i!}} = ...
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0answers
150 views

Step in proof involving Euler-Mascheroni constant

I was just looking at a proof that shows how the Euler-Mascheroni constant exists and is situated between 0 and 1 . However, I stumbled across a step in the proof that doesn't seem very obvious to me ....